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Album Reviews Article Fleetwood Mac Fleetwood Mac (1975)

REVIEW: Fleetwood Mac (1975) Deluxe Edition

Fleetwood Mac 1975, Deluxe EditionFLEETWOOD MAC

Rhino (4-CD, 1-LP Box Set)

**** (four stars out of five)

The latest, and possibly the last, in Rhino’s series of deluxe boxed Fleetwood Mac albums (they’re not really going to tackle Behind the Mask and Time, are they?) sits in a most peculiar position.

On the one hand, 1975’s eponymous LP features some of the band’s most beloved songs — “Rhiannon,” “Landslide,” “Crystal,” “World Turning”; three more sizeable radio hits — “Say You Love Me,” “Over My Head” and “Monday Morning”; and, of course, the most seismic new additions the group’s ever-changing lineup had seen, Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks.

On the other hand, however, Fleetwood Mac is so dwarfed by what came next, the mega-platinum double punch of Rumours and Tusk, that it is often… not overlooked, but certainly underrated. A fate which this box loudly declares to be utterly without merit.

The original album is problematic, it is true. The lineup was still finding its feet in the studio, still figuring out its capabilities. The songs which would probably have made it onto the record regardless of who the new kids might have been — McVie’s “Sugar Daddy,” “Over My Head” and “Warm Ways,” and Michael and Richard Curtis’s “Blue Letter” — could have been recorded just as successfully by at least the last couple of incarnations, while “Say You Love Me” escapes that definition only by virtue of a distinctly Buckingham-esque arrangement.

Sonically, too, it felt a little underwhelming, a bit too nice. A bit easy listening. Nothing like the aural feast that tears from the grooves of Rumours and beyond. Or maybe that’s just hindsight talking, because the first thing you notice this time around is, just how aggressive it can be.

Four discs (plus remastered vinyl of the original album) serve up Fleetwood Mac and four attendant single edits (disc one); early versions and a live appearance on the Warner Bros. sound stage (disc two); a compilation of tracks from the accompanying tour (disc three) and, finally, a 5.1 surround sound mix that brings a whole new ambiance into play.

Remixed, the album feels tougher, wilder. Buckingham’s guitar is seldom less than in-yer-face, while it feels as though the original mix was completely set aside, in favor of what the early versions and the live tracks reveal to have been the group’s natural sound.

Not every track has been re-envisioned, not every change is for the best — the added laughter and effects appended to “Sugar Daddy” do not raise the song above its customary mawkish demeanor, and the vocals on “I’m So Afraid” feel thinner than the song demands.

But “Over My Head” suddenly touches Tusk‘s “Warm Ways” in the quest for all-encompassing perfection; “Landslide” and “Crystal” feel more raw than ever; and “World Turning” is simply unhinged. Again, you catch hints of this in the alternate versions, and extensions of it in concert… the seven minute “Rhiannon,” taken from the Sound Stage tapes, is a tout-ensemble peak that Mac in general, and Nicks in particular, never recaptured. History itself might not have been rewritten had this mix been deployed back in 1975, but the album’s reputation may well have been.

With just one of the non-album tracks, the aptly-named “Jam #2,” having seen release in the past, the box is generous. The live discs afford us the opportunity to hear this lineup tackle selected highlights from the past (“Hypnotized” is a genuine treat), and though the liner essay feels a little too rote, the booklet itself packs some terrific photos. Indeed, no matter how much you love the other box sets in this series, Fleetwood Mac might well be the one you need to hear the most.

Maybe they should tackle Behind the Mask next.

Dave Thompson / Goldmine / April 2018, p. 31.

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Album Reviews Article Fleetwood Mac Fleetwood Mac (1975)

REVIEW: Fleetwood Mac Deluxe

Fleetwood Mac 1975, Deluxe EditionFLEETWOOD MAC

Fleetwood Mac: Deluxe

Reprise R2 559454 (1 LP/3 CDs/1 DVD). 1975/2018. Fleetwood Mac, prods.; Keith Olsen, prod., eng.; David Devoe, Dan Hersch, others, engs. ADD? TT: 3:27:04

PERFORMANCE **** 1/2

SONICS ****

I’ll never forget the first time I heard this album. I’d been a keen fan of Fleetwood Mac since its early days, and each release was greeted with great expectations. Like a lot of British blues bands of the late 1960s, in the mid-’70s the Mac seemed to struggle toward a difficult career coda; lineups didn’t last, and we even had to endure a completely different band touring under the Fleetwood Mac name.

But from the first joyous moments of Fleetwood Mac, it was clear that this new version of the band was something special. I’d heard and liked the California power pop of Buckingham Nicks, but had no inkling how well that duo could complete an entirely new Fleetwood Mac identity. Hearing Lindsey Buckingham’s “Monday Morning” ring out of my speakers was akin to hearing “Suite: Judy Blue Eyes” for the first time. The extraordinary harmonies of Buckingham, Stevie Nicks, and Christine McVie were the sound of angels, as yet another British singer found her true roots in California.

Fleetwood Mac 1975, Deluxe EditionThe shock of how good this record was accumulated as the disc played out and it became clear that the Mac had changed stripes. Always a guitarist’s guitar band with some great songwriting but vocals that were secondary to the overall sound, this Fleetwood Mac was all about the songs and the singing. Buckingham’s inspired guitar work was in support of the whole meal, but was not itself the main course. For the first time, the band featured three outstanding singers and songwriters, who balanced each other fully in all the compositions. The stalwart rhythm section of Christine McVie on keyboards, her husband, John McVie, on bass, and Mick Fleetwood on drums kept the core identity of the band on course.

Perhaps most important, the new lineup brought Christine McVie into focus. By this time, the Mac had long been a guy’s band, with Christine a featured element. Now she was the fulcrum between the old and new lineups, her dusky soprano the anchor between Buckingham’s jolly, effusive tenor and Nicks’s soaring alto. With Buckingham and Nicks as her band partners, McVie, one of the greatest R&B singer-songwriters England has ever produced, upped her writing game. She delivered soulful expressions of sexual emotion in “Say You Love Me,” “Over My Head,” and “Sugar Daddy,” and of abiding tenderness in “Warm Ways.” What’s more, it was now a woman’s band, with Christine and Nicks contrasting brilliandy. Nicks countered McVie’s earthiness with an ethereal, otherworldly quality in her writing epitomized by her self-branding vehicle, “Rhiannon,” and the timeless life metaphor of “Landslide,” still so apt today. Buckingham’s shimmering pop songs, including “World Turning,” cowritten with McVie, fit perfectly.

What we hear here is the magic of discovery. This band hadn’t even played together live when they began work on these tracks with producer Keith Olsen, and they were all finding something new about themselves. Perhaps one can’t attribute spirit or emotion to the technical job of recording sound, but I believe that Olsen’s original analog vision for this music can’t be improved on by a digital remastering. The 180gm vinyl of this new set is heavier than the original LP, and lovingly mastered by Dan Hersch in what might be called a modernization. Fleetwood’s drums are now closer to the front of the mix, but something unexplainable is missing from the sense of how it all hangs together. Instead of the music surrounding Buckingham’s voice, now it shoots past. Playing the new LP, I kept wanting to turn the volume up, but that only further diluted the song’s emotional core. If you want an LP of Fleetwood Mac, get an original pressing.

The real pay dirt is in the three CDs. The remastering, though inferior to the original CD, sounds appropriately bright, and fuller than the previous digital transfers in 1984 and 2004. Disc 1 also includes mixes of the singles “Over My Head,” “Rhiannon,” “Say You Love Me,” and “Blue Letter.” On Disc 2 we hear ideas being worked out in early takes, as well as live tracks from a Warner Bros, soundstage, where “Over My Head,” Rhiannon,” and “World Turning” hint at the concert staples they would become.

On disc 3, Fleetwood Mac morphs before live audiences into the band we still recognize today. The foundation jam tracks “Oh Well” and “The Green Manalishi (With the Two Pronged Crown),” from the Mac’s Peter Green era, still strut their stomp but are clearly not where this group is headed. The beautiful, hypnotic “Station Man,” a relic from the wonderful Kiln House, does manage to fit within the contours of the New Mac, and the expanded set list, which includes the soulful “Spare Me a Little,” emphasizes even more how much the new lineup has begun to orbit Christine McVie. Disc 4 is a DVD with a 5.1-channel surroundsound mix of the original album and two-channel, 24-bit/96kHz mixes of the four singles from disc 1. The music is also available as digital downloads and from streaming services.

Say you love me to my face

I need it more than your embrace

Just say you want me, that’s all it takes

Heart’s getting torn from your mistakes.”

—Christine McVie from “Say You Love Me”

John Swenson / Stereophile / April 2018

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Diamond returns with hits

Following the Jan. 22 announcement by Neil Diamond of his retirement from touring due to his recent Parkinson’s diagnosis, the music legend’s catalog grew in sales and streams during the week ending Jan. 25.

Diamond’s overall album sales jumped 157 percent to 6,000 copies sold, according to Nielsen Music. His total equivalent album units earned grew 121 percent to 10,000, while digital song sales vaulted 197 percent (to 14,000) and on-demand audio streams rose 41 percent (to 3.3 million).

His All-Time Greatest Hits album re-enters the Billboard 200 at No. 86 — its highest rank since 2014. It earned 7,000 units during the week (up 119 percent). The set also zooms 27-4 on the Catalog Album Sales chart with 4,000 sold (up 164 percent).

Also on Catalog Album Sales, Fleetwood Mac‘s self-titled 1975 album re-enters the list at No. 7 with 3,000 sold (up 3,528 percent). The set, which was the band’s first No. 1 on the Billboard 200, rebounds thanks to its deluxe reissue on Jan. 19. The album was available in various remastered editions, some with multiple bonus tracks, all of which are tracked together for sales and charting purposes. Fleetwood Mac also reenters the Billboard 200 at No. 132, the first time the set has been on the list since 2012, and its highest rank since 1981. The Fleetwood Mac redux is the latest expansive archival reissue from the act, following Rumours (in 2013), Tusk (2015), Mirage (2016) and Tango in the Night (2017).

Keith Caulfield / Billboard / February 3, 2018, p. 58

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Fleetwood Mac (1975)

Scans of Fleetwood Mac Deluxe

Enjoy these scans from Fleetwood Mac (Deluxe Edition).

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Article Fleetwood Mac (1975)

Landslides, Goose Bumps, and Other First Initial Feelings

“Do you always trust your first initial feeling?”

That was the memorable question poetically posed in the song “Crystal,” a gorgeous composition written by Stevie Nicks, featuring a moving lead vocal by Lindsey Buckingham that was first recorded for their 1973 debut effort as a duo, Buckingham Nicks; and then more famously redone for Fleetwood Mac, the game-changing 1975 release that will forever hold a special place in the enduring history of this legendary band.

Fleetwood Mac — also commonly known as “The White Album” — would ultimately prove in the best possible way that hood things do indeed come to those who dare to trust their first initial feelings. Whereas The Beatles’ “White Album” captured a brilliant band just as it was starting to splinter in separate directions, Fleetwood Mac’s own “White Album” marked the opposite — that notable moment when another genuinely fabulous band’s most beloved and successful lineup first came together. In a sense, Fleetwood Mac stands as the late-breaking origin story that tells the true tale of how a dynamic but little-known duo from America joined forces with what was left of a better-known but somewhat struggling blues band from England, then somehow all simultaneously becoming international superstars in the process. And to think, it all happened because Mick Fleetwood took a giant leap of faith and trusted a gut instinct as if it was pure crystalline knowledge.

“Thankfully, the undeniable musical genius of Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks struck an instant chord with me when I first heard them,” Mick Fleetwood says today, with a laugh. “So I trusted my first initial feeling, and believe me, that has made all the difference.”

“This Fleetwood Mac album represents a magical time to remember when the planets all aligned for us,” adds Christine McVie, still sounding extremely grateful, all these years later. “This is where the goose bumps all began.”

Long ago and far away in the distant time called the middle ‘70s, Fleetwood Mac was an established veteran band that had already survived numerous incarnations and dramatic personnel changes since their early days in the British blue-rock scene of the late ‘60s, initially fronted by Peter Green, a notable guitar god who had left the group back in 1970. There were times when one really needed a scorecard to keep track of who was on the Fleetwood Mac team. Then in late 1974, Fleetwood Mac hit another significant bump in the road when the group’s latest lead guitarist, frequent lead singer and songwriter Bob Welch, announced he was leaving. And now there were just three band members left in the ranks of Fleetwood Mac — name partners Mick Fleetwood on drums, John McVie on bass, and Christine McVie (former Christine Perfect) still there and still perfect on keyboards and vocals, and by now married to her bandmate.

It is what we’re discussing here. It is what made Lindsey’s guitar and that vocal blend with Stevie stay with me. It is whatever makes music and people connect. Ultimately, It is what it’s about.”—MICK FLEETWOOD

A sudden departure like Welch’s might have ended up causing some lesser bands to throw in the towel, but not a band with an endlessly energetic and optimistic drummer and then-manager like Mick Fleetwood. Rather, Mick instantly flashed back a few weeks to a tip he had taken in search of a relatively inexpensive place to record Fleetwood Mac’s next album — their tenth — in the Los Angeles area. At the behest of Keith Olsen, an excellent producer and engineer acquaintance of his, Fleetwood took a little time to go check out the Sound City Studios in Van Nuys, California, much later to become legendary thanks to Dave Grohl’s documentary of the same name. While there, Olsen demonstrated Sound City’s sonic potential by playing Fleetwood a few tracks from the Buckingham Nicks album he had produced there. Though the release had already come and gone commercially, something about the music stayed with Fleetwood, particularly the unusual and impressive guitar work from this Lindsey Buckingham character. “Lindsey’s style was so stunning and unique, it was what hit me first, and it hit me hard.”

“Mick has a sixth or seventh sense about these things,” Christine McVie says, before adding, “He may have made a few mistakes in band personnel over the years, but this was definitely not one of them.”

“That hour and a half spent in Sound City changed everything,” says Fleetwood. “I think Keith Olsen played me ‘Frozen Love,’ ‘Crying in the Night,’ and ‘Crystal’ — which we ended up re-cutting for Fleetwood Mac — by Buckingham Nicks. I do not believe I even heard the whole album. Bob Welch had not left yet. So I was not looking for a new guitarist or other band members at the time. It was purely the music that, by some miracle, made such a vivid impression. And I give myself kudos there because the music Lindsey and Stevie were making was very different — it wasn’t blues or the sort of thing I’d been brought up on. But what it did have was something that from the start in this band, Peter Green — who taught me so much — me, and, John used to call simply ‘It.’ We’d always say, ‘Yes, but does it have It.’ It is what we’re discussing here. It is what made Lindsey’s guitar and that vocal blend with Stevie stay with me. It is whatever makes music and people connect. Ultimately, It is what it’s about.”

And yet it all almost didn’t happen because, as Stevie Nicks still loves to jokingly remind Mick Fleetwood, his initial call was to Lindsey Buckingham to ask only him about joining Fleetwood Mac, and not her. “In my defense, our pressing need at the moment was for a guitar player,” Fleetwood recalls with a laugh. “To Lindsey’s credit, Buckingham made it immediately and eminently clear that he wasn’t going anywhere without Stevie Nicks.” Thankfully, Buckingham’s bold insistence on this matter led to Fleetwood Mac making perhaps the single greatest package deal in all of musical history. Yet before this wildly successful musical merger could happen, there were a few matters to attend to, like these young Americans getting to know the current British band members to see if they could work and play well with another.

The now-legendary Fleetwood Mac chemistry test took place at El Carmen, a Mexican restaurant on 3rd Street in Los Angeles. “We already loved the music,” remembers Mick Fleetwood, “but the dinner was the audition. Because the only thing Chris said to me was, ‘There’s nothing worse than two women who don’t get on. And I’ll know right away.’ So that was a very pivotal dinner. Luckily, Chis loved Stevie, straight away — this sparkling, little high-energy lady. And that was that. Lindsey and Stevie were asked to play with us without ever playing a note with us. It’s almost insane in retrospect considering the high risk, but somehow Christine and all of us knew.”

As Christine McVie remembers, “What Mick said to me before the meeting was, ‘Chris, if you don’t like the girl, then it’s not going to happen.’ I had never been in a band with another girl before, so it was important. So we met for Mexican food. First, right from their entrance, I was so struck by the way Lindsey looked when he in walked in the door — I said to myself, Wow, this guy is a god. And then Stevie walked in laughing, so cute and so tiny, and I took an instant liking to her. She has this wonderful laugh and a fantastic sense of humor. So by the end of that evening, I said, ‘Mick, let’s do this.’”

For Christine McVie, the key moment came a little later when the group finally gathered for their first musical rehearsal. “I had written a new song called ‘Say You Love Me’ that ended up being a bit of a hit,” she explains. “So I just started playing the song, and when the chorus came around and I sang, they started piping in with these perfect three-part harmonies. We carried on singing, but we all got enormous goose bumps. I looked at Mick, and he looked at me, and we went, ‘This is it.’ We would talk a lot about ‘The It Factor’ then, and this was It all over. Right from that moment, we went straight into making this album, and the whole experience was this wonderful giant discovery. We all had the best time, and I think that joy comes across even when you listen to it today.”

“As soon as Christine heard the Buckingham Nicks music she knew there were musical and harmonic possibilities she could not deny,” says Fleetwood. “A huge switch went off in her head, and by hearing all the harmonies and layering, there was something thrilling here to explore. We’d only touched a little on harmonies with Bob Welch, but these two new voices exploded in our heads, and suddenly, all these possibilities opened up because these two were so good, such powerhouses. When I first heard Lindsey and Stevie, it was like hearing The Everly Brothers on steroids, where they know instinctively what they are doing at any given moment. Christine adding her own earthy tones and soul to that made for some extreme magic right away. Hearing us all together for the first time is the reason we’re all still talking about this album after all this time.”

For Christine, the addition of Buckingham and Nicks was not simply a golden opportunity, but also the best kind of artistic challenge. “I was excited by their talent, but I also sensed I had to upgrade my game as a songwriter to keep up with them after I heard the Buckingham Nicks album,” she explains. “I thought, Crickey, these two can really write. So I got on my piano — one of those transistorized Hohners — in a tiny bedsit that John and I rented in Malibu, right on the ocean. And I sat there and wrote ‘Over My Head,’ ‘Warm Ways’ — those two at least. And I also found Lindsey, and I could co-write — ‘World Turning’ was our first song together and a strong start.”

Even all these years later, the overall strength of the material featured on Fleetwood Mac remains astounding, with McVie singling out “Monday Morning” and “I’m So Afraid” by Buckingham, and “Rhiannon” and “Landslide” by Nicks as just a few of her many favorites. And somehow, despite all the change and the new infusion of talent, including Buckingham’s growing strength as an arranger and producer, there remains the pulse of Fleetwood Mac, thanks in large part to the distinctive pulse of the group’s rhythm section. “If you change members in a lot of other big bands, I don’t think they change the essence, the musical identity as much as we have,” says Mick Fleetwood. “Put on this album and put on Live At Chess Records with Peter Green, and it is stunning to think that can be the same band, but somehow it is. I feel like there are other bands that have survived, but no other that changed as much, and despite or perhaps because of that somehow survived as well. I think perhaps John and I hanging in there allowed this funny diverse band to keep changing and evolving. It was really all three of the writers’ songs — and our balls — keeping it going. And the album you’re writing about that is that line in the sand where you can see the biggest and most significant change. It came along at a time when it could have the end, but instead it became a new beginning.”

With the initial sessions for Fleetwood Mac proceeding so well in Sound City, Mick Fleetwood couldn’t wait to take this new version of Fleetwood Mac on the road. As he recalls, “At that time I was the manager — or the nearest facsimile to a manager we had — so I remember going to see Mo Ostin at our label, Warner Bros., while we were making that album, and it was so evident to all of us that something was happening. So I took some of the tracks, and I remember I went around the corner for two brandies to pluck the courage before seeing the big head honcho. I sat down with Mo and said, ‘I’m just saying, if you don’t hear something special here, will you let us go? Because I really believe this is something special.’ It was a kind of naive threat, I think. And of course, Mo loved it. Then I said, ‘This is so special, I think we need to go out as a band because I knew when the record came out, we had to be ready for whatever came. Also we really needed a little pocket money.”

Right from that moment, we went straight into making this album, and the whole experience was this wonderful giant discovery. We all had the best time, and I think that joy comes across even when you listen to it today.” —CHRISTINE MCVIE

Thinking back now, Mick Fleetwood says, “We were literally knowing but unknowing about what lay ahead for us. But I wanted to make sure we were tried and tested and ready for whatever was coming. Lindsey and Stevie walked onstage with nobody knowing who they were as part of Fleetwood Mac, playing some of our old music, a few songs of theirs, and of course, some of the stuff on our album to come. Yet when we walked on the stage together, we instantly saw our audience coming alive, as something new unfolded onstage. So we did a short tour like that, went back and finished the album already knowing that we were ready for whatever came. We knew there was this tremendous chemistry onstage. We became very aware of what a remarkable player Lindsey is and of young Stevie’s amazing stage presence, and how that changed the game. And the rest is history.”

As Christine recalls, “Obviously, we started out in some half-empty halls, but right away there was something happening onstage that ignited between the five of us. Even back then before all the social media, there was word of mouth and good reviews, and gradually the audience heard the buzz and started showing.”

Fleetwood Mac was released in July 1975 by Warner’s Reprise label, and shared that minimalist title with the group’s 1968 debut. Gradually, the new album became a slow-burning sensation — reaching #1 on the Billboard 200 more than a year after entering the chart. Ultimately, the album would spend 37 weeks in the Top Ten and more than fifteen months in the Top 40. The “White Album” became the second-biggest album of 1976, outsold only by Peter Frampton’s Frampton Comes Alive. As singles from the album, “Over My Head,” “Rhiannon,” and “Say You Love Me,” all went Top 20, “Monday Morning” became an FM favorite, and “Landslide” slowly but surely emerged as an enduring standard. Another radio favorite was “Blue Letter,” a song with a lead vocal by Buckingham, which Lindsey and Stevie had demoed with their former Polydor labelmates, The Curtis Bros., making it a rare cover for this lineup of Fleetwood Mac.

In the end, the goose bumps were only the beginning. “There was such a sense of excitement, you didn’t want to leave the studio,” say Christine McVie. “We are so diverse in so many ways, including that we have men and women, Americans and Brits, and three main writers with very different styles of writing. We all sing on each other’s songs. And the songs themselves are diverse. Yet there’s always a thread that catches all the songs together and makes all the pieces fit. Even before there was ‘The Chain,” there was something tying us all together.”

David Wild / Fleetwood Mac – Deluxe Edition / January 19, 2018

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Stream tracks from Fleetwood Mac Deluxe Edition

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Enter to win a copy of Fleetwood Mac Deluxe!

We are giving away free copies of Fleetwood Mac Deluxe! Simply register below for a chance to win.

Winner of Drawing #1 (January 19): Courtney K.
Winner of Drawing #2: (February 23): Melanie H.

 

[contact-form-7 id=”380938″ title=”Fleetwood Mac Deluxe Contest”]

FLEETWOOD MAC: DELUXE EDITION is packaged in a 12 x 12 embossed sleeve with rare and unseen photos along with in-depth liner notes written by David Wild featuring new interviews with all the band members. Features a newly remastered version of the original album along with single mixes for “Over My Head,” “Rhiannon,” “Say You Love Me.” Also included is a second disc with an alternate version of the complete album comprised of unreleased outtakes for each album track, plus several unreleased live performances from 1976. Exclusive to the deluxe edition is a third disc filled with even more unreleased live recordings highlighted by stellar performances of “Landslide,” “Oh Well,” “Station Man,” “World Turning,” among others.

FLEETWOOD MAC: DELUXE EDITION also comes with a DVD featuring 5.1 Surround Sound and high-resolution 24/96 Stereo Audio mixes of the original album and four single mixes. Completing the set is an LP version of the original album pressed on 180-gram vinyl.

Disc: 1
1. Monday Morning (Remastered)
2. Warm Ways (Remastered)
3. Blue Letter (Remastered)
4. Rhiannon (Remastered)
5. Over My Head (Remastered)
6. Crystal (Remastered)
7. Say You Love Me (Remastered)
8. Landslide (Remastered)
9. World Turning (Remastered)
10. Sugar Daddy (Remastered)
11. I’m So Afraid (Remastered)
12. Over My Head (Single Version) [Remastered]
13. Rhiannon (Will You Ever Win) [Single Version] [Remastered]
14. Say You Love Me (Single Version) [Remastered]
15. Blue Letter (Single Version)

Disc: 2
1. Monday Morning (Early Take)
2. Warm Ways (Early Take)
3. Blue Letter (Early Take)
4. Rhiannon (Early Take)
5. Over My Head (Early Take)
6. Crystal (Early Version)
7. Say You Love Me (Early Version)
8. Landslide (Early Version)
9. World Turning (Early Version)
10. Sugar Daddy (Early Take)
11. I’m So Afraid (Early Version)
12. Over My Head (Live from The Burbank Studios, Burbank, CA, 1/26/76)
13. Rhiannon (Live from The Burbank Studios, Burbank, CA, 1/26/76)
14. Why (Live from The Burbank Studios, Burbank, CA, 1/26/76)
15. World Turning (Live from The Burbank Studios, Burbank, CA, 1/26/76)
16. Jam #2 (Remastered)
17. I’m So Afraid (Early Take Instrumental)

Disc: 3
1. Get Like You Used To Be (Live at Capitol Theatre, Passaic, NJ, 10/17/75)
2. Station Man (Live at Jorgensen Auditorium, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, 10/25/75)
3. Spare Me A Little (Live at Jorgensen Auditorium, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, 10/25/75)
4. Rhiannon (Live at Jorgensen Auditorium, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, 10/25/75)
5. Why (Live at Jorgensen Auditorium, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, 10/25/75)
6. Landslide (Live at Jorgensen Auditorium, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, 10/25/75)
7. Over My Head (Live at Campus Stadium, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 5/2/76)
8. I’m So Afraid (Live at Capitol Theatre, Passaic, NJ, 10/17/75)
9. Oh Well (Live at Capitol Theatre, Passaic, NJ, 10/17/75)
10. The Green Manalishi (With The Two Pronged Crown) [Live at Capitol Theatre, Passaic, NJ, 10/17/75]
11. World Turning (Live at Capitol Theatre, Passaic, NJ, 10/17/75)
12. Blue Letter (Live at Capitol Theatre, Passaic, NJ, 10/17/75)
13. Don’t Let Me Down Again (Live at Jorgensen Auditorium, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, 10/25/
14. Hypnotized (Live at Jorgensen Auditorium, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, 10/25/75)

Disc: 4
1. Monday Morning (5.1 Surround Mix)
2. Warm Ways (5.1 Surround Mix)
3. Blue Letter (5.1 Surround Mix)
4. Rhiannon (5.1 Surround Mix)
5. Over My Head (5.1 Surround Mix)
6. Crystal (5.1 Surround Mix)
7. Say You Love Me (5.1 Surround Mix)
8. Landslide (5.1 Surround Mix)
9. World Turning (5.1 Surround Mix)
10. Sugar Daddy (5.1 Surround Mix)
11. I’m So Afraid (5.1 Surround Mix)
12. Monday Morning (24/96 Stereo Audio)
13. Warm Ways (24/96 Stereo Audio)
14. Blue Letter (24/96 Stereo Audio)
15. Rhiannon (24/96 Stereo Audio)
16. Over My Head (24/96 Stereo Audio)
17. Crystal (24/96 Stereo Audio)
18. Say You Love Me (24/96 Stereo Audio)
19. Landslide (24/96 Stereo Audio)
20. World Turning (24/96 Stereo Audio)
21. Sugar Daddy (24/96 Stereo Audio)
22. I’m So Afraid (24/96 Stereo Audio)
23. Over My Head (Single Version)
24. Rhiannon (Will You Ever Win) [Single Version]
25. Say You Love Me (Single Version)
26. Blue Letter (Single Version)

Disc: 5
1. Say You Love Me (Remastered)
2. Landslide (Remastered)
3. World Turning (Remastered)
4. Sugar Daddy (Remastered)
5. I’m So Afraid (Remastered)
6. Crystal (Remastered)

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Fleetwood Mac (1975)

Hear an early version of ‘Monday Morning’

Fleetwood Mac has shared another rare track from its upcoming Fleetwood Mac reissue, an early version of the jaunty “Monday Morning.” The early take sounds a bit slower than the final recording and doesn’t have Stevie Nicks’ signature harmonies, but the track highlights Mick Fleetwood’s spirited drumming and includes a few playful ad-libs from Lindsey Buckingham.

Here’s Billboard Magazine’s review of the track:

As the opening track on 1975’s five-times-platinum Fleetwood Mac album, “Monday Morning” was the first thing most fans heard from the new incarnation of the band after Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks joined. But the song also revealed a new Buckingham. You can listen to an exclusive early take of the song, from the upcoming Fleetwood Mac deluxe edition, below.

The singer-guitarist and his then-girlfriend Nicks joined Fleetwood Mac at the recommendation of co-producer Keith Olsen, after releasing their own Buckingham Nicks album. And Buckingham freely acknowledges that becoming part of a group required him to adjust his approach to music.

“If you go all the way back to before Stevie and I joined Fleetwood Mac, the application of guitar was a lot more prevalent in the whole scheme of the space that was taken and the work that was done by a particular instrument,” Buckingham, who wrote the buoyant, surging “Monday Morning” for a second Buckingham Nicks album, told Billboard previously. “I wasn’t even sure what my role was gonna be at that point; Obviously it was kind of a lesson in adaptation for me, and maybe giving up on certain things and concentrating on other things which were maybe strengths for the good of the band. So part of the exercise of joining Fleetwood Mac was adapting down to not only fit a sound, but I had to get off the guitar I was using and get on to a Les Paul. Their sound was very fat, and the nature of the playing with Christine (McVie) and John (McVie), there was a lot of space taken, so you had to sort of take what was left and fit into it.”

He clearly figured it out. Fleetwood Mac (aka The White Album) was the veteran group’s most successful to that point, hitting No. 1 on the Billboard 200 during the summer of 1976 and spawning three Hot 100 top 20 hits in “Over My Head,” “Rhiannon” and “Say You Love Me.” It also established a new creative partnership between Buckingham and Christine McVie — directly via their co-write of the track “World Turning” but also with Buckingham as a sounding board for McVie’s other songs, a relationship that came to full fruition with last year’s Lindsey Buckingham Christine McVie duo album.

“It just came from this chemistry that I can’t really analyze,” explained Buckingham. “I remember being in rehearsals with Christine and the rest of the band before we cut that first album and we were running down song ideas. But it was so clear that right away that Christine and I had this thing. She was just really looking for direction. She was open to me taking liberties with her songs. So early on, that was probably the first thing that hit me about being in Fleetwood Mac was being extremely aware that I had something to contribute to Christine’s songs as a producer and possibly as a co-writer.

“I think we just have this mutual respect as musicians and as artists. We’re both really grounded in our craft, and I think in the same way she’s filled in the middle ground between one pole and another pole that Stevie and I might represent, you know, on the right and the left, I think that when you make it just the two of us it’s that thing. It sort of naturally unites.”

The Fleetwood Mac: Deluxe Edition comes out Jan. 19 in a variety of formats, the expanded editions including more unreleased early takes and live tracks. The band, meanwhile, is expected to be touring during the coming year, though Buckingham also has a solo album that’s due out this year. “I think the earliest anyone expected to be back on the road with Fleetwood Mac might’ve been spring of 2018,” Buckingham said last year. “Stevie, my understanding is that she’s all ready. I’ve got this solo album; I’m the one who’s holding it up. But, you know, that’s typical for us. There’s a lot of moving parts so, you know, you gotta wait for everyone to be ready.”

Gary Graff / Billboard / Thursday, January 11, 2018

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Fleetwood Mac (1975)

Hear Early Version of ‘Landslide’ from upcoming deluxe reissue

Fleetwood Mac has released an early version of “Landslide” from the forthcoming deluxe reissue of Fleetwood Mac (1975). The early version features a different vocal from Stevie Nicks with simple guitar work from Lindsey Buckingham, much like how it’s performed today onstage.

Fleetwood Mac Deluxe will be released on Friday, January 19 and can be pre-ordered now.

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Album Reviews Article Fleetwood Mac Fleetwood Mac (1975)

Mac-ing a mountain out of a molehill

REVIEW
Fleetwood Mac
Fleetwood Mac — Deluxe
** (two stars)

Rhino 0081227940669
(CD/2CD/3CD+DVD+LP)

Do you need another expanded copy of Fleetwood Mac? We’re not so sure. There’s the remastered album, though arguably it has always been a mixed bag, carried on the strengths of Stevie Nicks’ and Christine McVie’s excellent contributions.

There is a disc of demos which, in truth, don’t stray too far from the finished products, with only slight alterations being generally noticeable, such as some added guitar work on “Say You Love Me” or a fully acoustic “Landslide.” Similarly extras such as Jam #2 and single versions of the hits were all issued on a 2004 package.

The remainder showcases previously unreleased live takes from the Jorgensen Auditorium in Connecticut, among other venues and while overall enjoyable, versions of songs like “Rhiannon” reveal that at their worst, the band are given to bloated pomp; with chief offenders being the indulgent guitar playing of Buckingham and Nicks’ clumsy lyric changes.

There are some interesting live cuts of “Why” and “Hypnotized” (Mystery To Me); “Station Man” (Kiln House); “Spare Me A Little Of Your Love” (Bare Trees); “Don’t Let Me Down Again” from Buckingham/ Nicks and Peter Green’s “Oh Well” and “The Green Manalishi With The Two Pronged Crown” — clearly performed with love but still best heard when performed by early Mac.

Completlsts will want It but better was to follow, and this set is overall a reminder of that.

Hannah Vettese / Record Collector / January 2018

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Fleetwood Mac Fleetwood Mac (1975)

Fleetwood Mac ‘Deluxe’ out Jan 19

Fleetwood Mac will be releasing three editions of its 1975 self-titled album, including a fully-loaded Deluxe set, on January 19. The band issued a new release about the reissues on its official website. The reissue sets up the promotion for the band’s world tour, which is expected to kick off in 2018.

Deluxe (3CD/DVD/LP): The original album with newly remastered audio on CD and LP; rare and unreleased studio and live recordings; plus a DVD with 5.1 Surround Sound and high-resolution mixes of the original album.

Expanded (2CD): The original album with newly remastered sound expanded with rare and unreleased studio and live recordings.

Remastered (CD): Original album with newly remastered sound.

Remastered audio will also via digital download and streaming services. The deluxe can be pre-ordered from Amazon now.

Fleetwood Mac Deluxe Edition Track List

Disc One – Original Album Remastered and Singles
1. “Monday Morning”
2. “Warm Ways”
3. “Blue Letter”
4. “Rhiannon”
5. “Over My Head”
6. “Crystal”
7. “Say You Love Me”
8. “Landslide”
9. “World Turning”
10. “Sugar Daddy”
11. “I’m So Afraid”
12. “Over My Head” – Single Version
13. “Rhiannon” – Single Version
14. “Say You Love Me” – Single Version
15. “Blue Letter” – Single Version

Disc Two – Alternates and Live
1. “Monday Morning” – Early Take
2. “Warm Ways” – Early Take
3. “Blue Letter” – Early Take
4. “Rhiannon” – Early Take
5. “Over My Head” – Early Take
6. “Crystal” – Early Take
7. “Say You Love Me” – Early Version
8. “Landslide” – Early Version
9. “World Turning” – Early Version
10. “Sugar Daddy” – Early Take
11. “I’m So Afraid” – Early Version
12. “Over My Head” – Live
13. “Rhiannon” – Live
14. “Why” – Live
15. “World Turning” – Live
16. Jam #2
17. “I’m So Afraid” – Early Take Instrumental

Disc Three – Live
1. “Get Like You Used To Be”
2. “Station Man”
3. “Spare Me A Little”
4. “Rhiannon”
5. “Why”
6. “Landslide”
7. “Over My Head”
8. “I’m So Afraid”
9. “Oh Well”
10. “The Green Manalishi (With The Two Pronged Crown)”
11. “World Turning”
12. “Blue Letter”
13. “Don’t Let Me Down Again”
14. “Hypnotized”

Check back soon for details on how you can enter to win a free copy of Fleetwood Mac Deluxe!

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Fleetwood Mac (1975) Grammy Awards

‘The White Album’ inducted into Grammy Hall of Fame

Fleetwood Mac’s eponymous 1975 album, known as “The White Album,” has been inducted in the Recording Academy’s Grammy Hall of Fame in 2016, according to Billboard Magazine. Released on July 11, 1975, Fleetwood Mac was the first album in the band’s eight-year history to feature guitarist Lindsey Buckingham and singer Stevie Nicks, who joined in December 1974. Taking almost a full year to reach No. 1 on the Billboard 200 Albums chart, Fleetwood Mac produced the popular singles “Over My Head” (#20), “Rhiannon (Will You Ever Win)” (#11), and “Say You Love” (#11) — the first U.S. Top 40 singles for the English/American band. The sleeper hit has since sold more than five million copies in the U.S., and 10 million copies worldwide.

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Clive Davis Fleetwood Mac (1975)

Clive Davis: Fleetwood Mac almost signed with Arista Records in 1975

2013-0219-clive-davis-300Clive Davis, Chief Creative Officer for Sony Music Entertainment, describes an interesting story about Fleetwood Mac in his new book The Soundtrack of My Life. In the following excerpt, Davis recounts how Fleetwood Mac almost signed with Arista Records in 1975, being unhappy with album promotion efforts at Warner Bros. Records. But “bad timing” spoiled the deal.

“Well, the right artists did come along but, unfortunately in some cases, not at the right time. Fleetwood Mac were very unhappy at Warner Bros. Their album sales were stuck in the range of around 200,000, a less than respectable figure for a band of their stature. In 1975, I saw them at the Beacon Theatre, and was very impressed by the new lineup, which had only recently released an album, titled Fleetwood Mac as if to assert that while the band had the same name, it had a completely new identity. Joining the original rhythm section of Mick Fleetwood and John McVie and the exceptional singer, keyboard player, and songwriter Christine McVie were Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks. There was such a depth in the band, such chemistry and chrisma. Though the good offices of their attorney, Mickey Shapiro, I personally met with them, and did learn that they felt they weren’t being given the attention they warranted at the label. They thought the infusion of new energy with the attention of Lindsey and Stevie was going unnoticed at Warners. The album was released in the summer with little fanfare, a single, “Over My Head,” was just coming out, and at the time, it didn’t seem to the band that the label was 100 percent behind them. We made a deal, and all went out to lunch at a great New York restaurant of the era, Maxwell’s Plum, to celebrate. I still have the contract, ready for signatures, in my files.”

“A similar scenario played out with Jefferson Starship. I’d always been a fan of Jefferson Airplane, and thought there was a lot of life left in the spin-off band. They were feeling unloved at RCA Records, and we came to terms with them as well. Fleetwood Mac and Jefferson Starship: pretty impressive signing coups. Each of those bands still owed two albums to its label, and the albums that were released while we were in talks with them exploded. Fleetwood Mac took the refurbished group from a 1974 album that didn’t even go gold to one that went five times platinum. The Starship’s Red Octopus, propelled by the hit “Miracles,” sold more than 2 million copies (up from gold on their 1974 album). Good news for the bands, but not for us. Needless to say, once those album sales racked up, Warners and RCA didn’t want to lose them. They made offers that, in pure dollar terms, were equal to ours, but made those deals retrospective to the current smash albums. Based on what those albums sold, the bands were in a position to clear $2 million or more just from that aspect of their deals, and we couldn’t possibly compete with that. We weren’t the ones making the income (and dramatic profits) on those records. What bad timing for us, and how it stung when I saw the sales of the next Fleetwood Mac album, Rumours. If their albums hadn’t broken wide open when they did, there’s no question Arista would have had both of those bands. And I should add that we were also in talks with Electric Light Orchestra, and came close to signing them. All three of these major bands were on the verge of coming to Arista within a six-month period.”

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Fleetwood Mac (1975)

Sound City: Real to Reel (Video Screen Caps)

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Fleetwood Mac (1975) Glee Gwyneth Paltrow Landslide

Stevie Nicks graces the set of Glee

PerezHilton
February 10, 2011 7:30 AM ET

Oh. Em. Glee!!!!

Of all the times we’ve dream of visiting McKinley High, never have we ever wanted to be there more than yesterday.

According to the cast, Glee was visited by Stevie Nicks yesterday, as they were shooting scenes with Gwyneth Paltrow. Apparently, her visit was a surprise to the kids as Dianna Agron raved on her Twitter that it was a “wonderful and unexpected day.”

The gang is rumored to be singing “Landslide” with Gwyn in a future episode, but don’t expect Stevie to jump in the chorus. We’re told Stevie didn’t film any scenes during her visit and there are no plans for her to in the near future. (Boo!)

But fear not! When her rep was reached for comment, he gave us a glimmer of hope. He told sources, ‘We can of course hope and dream of a day when that could happen.’

Wishing, hoping, praying and dreaming for that every day! But we understand; she has an album and a tour coming up. Stevie is very busy.

But never forget, Ryan Murphy, she’s game for it! Make sure to revisit this sometime soon! Very soon!

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Fleetwood Mac (1975) Rumours (1977)

Big Mac

Big Mac: two all gold albums special songs let-ups cheesecake pickles divorce on a star-crossed success run.

This article is not available

John Grissim / Crawdaddy (November 1976, Issue 66, p33-40. 8p)

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Fleetwood Mac (1975)

Portrait: Stevie Nicks

This article is not available

Creem (Vol. 7, p29) / April 1976

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Fleetwood Mac (1975)

Fleetwood Mac

NOT ONLY IS Fleetwood Mac no longer blues oriented, it isn’t even really British: The two newest members, Lindsey Buckingham (guitar and vocals) and Stevie Nicks (vocals, acoustic guitar) are American, and all five members are now based in Los Angeles.

The band began its spiritual journey to L.A. a half-dozen albums ago on Future Games when it was led by the often dazzling guitarist/singer Danny Kirwan. Kirwan is long gone but his inspiration lingers in the songs and singing of Christine McVie (who’s also developed into an effective keyboard player) and in the electric guitar playing of Buckingham, who likes to interpose aching, Kirwanesque leads and textured, Byrds-like rhythm lines. Thanks to their efforts, Fleetwood Mac is easily the group’s best and most consistent album since Bare Trees, the last to feature Kirwan.

The four songs written and sung by Christine McVie make it clearer than ever that she’s one of the best female vocalists in pop, and a deft song craftswoman as well. “Say You Love Me,” “Over My Head,” “Sugar Daddy” and “Warm Ways” transform conventional pop-song structures into durably attractive and believably genuine pieces – each sounds like an ideal radio song. McVie’s singing — slightly husky, not beautiful but unaffected — is simply captivating; she does everything right.

But her contributions have been a strong point since she first appeared with the group on Kiln House; what makes this album a marked improvement over the last several are the efforts of Buckingham, who gives Fleetwood Mac a distinguished and fitting guitar and vocal presence, something the band has lacked since Kirwan’s departure. Of the four tracks he dominates, “Monday Morning” has the most initial appeal, but the hard-edged guitar song, “World Turning” (a McVie/Buckingham collaboration) and the gorgeously somber “I’m So Afraid” stand out more and more as the album grows more familiar.

Nicks, on the other hand, has yet to integrate herself into the group style. Compared to McVie’s, her singing seems callow and mannered, especially on “Landslide,” where she sounds lost and out of place — although to be fair, this is more a problem of context than of absolute quality. Her “Rhiannon,” colored by Buckingham’s Kirwan-style guitar, works a little better and “Crystal,” on which Buckingham joins her on lead vocal, suggests that she may yet find a comfortable slot in this band.

Thanks to the rapport that is evident between McVie and Buckingham, Fleetwood Mac adds up to an impressively smooth transitional album.

© Bud Scoppa / Rolling Stone / September 25, 1975

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Album Reviews Fleetwood Mac (1975)

ALBUM REVIEW: Fleetwood Mac

Not only is Fleetwood Mac no longer blues oriented, it isn’t even really British: The two newest members, Lindsey Buckingham (guitar and vocals) and Stevie Nicks (vocals, acoustic guitar) are American, and all five members are now based in Los Angeles.

The band began its spiritual journey to L.A. a half-dozen albums ago on Future Games when it was led by the often dazzling guitarist/singer Danny Kirwan. Kirwan is long gone but his inspiration lingers in the songs and singing of Christine McVie (who’s also developed into an effective keyboard player) and in the electric guitar playing of Buckingham, who likes to interpose aching, Kirwanesque leads and textured, Byrds-like rhythm lines. Thanks to their efforts, Fleetwood Mac is easily the group’s best and most consistent album since Bare Trees, the last to feature Kirwan.

The four songs written and sung by Christine McVie make it clearer than ever that she’s one of the best female vocalists in pop, and a deft song craftswoman as well. “Say You Love Me,” “Over My Head,” “Sugar Daddy” and “Warm Ways” transform conventional pop-song structures into durably attractive and believably genuine pieces – each sounds like an ideal radio song. McVie’s singing — slightly husky, not beautiful but unaffected — is simply captivating; she does everything right.

But her contributions have been a strong point since she first appeared with the group on Kiln House; what makes this album a marked improvement over the last several are the efforts of Buckingham, who gives Fleetwood Mac a distinguished and fitting guitar and vocal presence, something the band has lacked since Kirwan’s departure. Of the four tracks he dominates, “Monday Morning” has the most initial appeal, but the hard-edged guitar song, “World Turning” (a McVie/Buckingham collaboration) and the gorgeously somber “I’m So Afraid” stand out more and more as the album grows more familiar.

Nicks, on the other hand, has yet to integrate herself into the group style. Compared to McVie’s, her singing seems callow and mannered, especially on “Landslide,” where she sounds lost and out of place — although to be fair, this is more a problem of context than of absolute quality. Her “Rhiannon,” colored by Buckingham’s Kirwan-style guitar, works a little better and “Crystal,” on which Buckingham joins her on lead vocal, suggests that she may yet find a comfortable slot in this band.

Thanks to the rapport that is evident between McVie and Buckingham, Fleetwood Mac adds up to an impressively smooth transitional album.

Bud Scoppa / Rolling Stone / September 25, 1975