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2014-2015 On With the Show Tour

VIDEOS 12/17: Philips Arena, Atlanta

Fleetwood Mac continued its tour of the Deep South on Wednesday night, performing at Philips Arena in Atlanta, the band’s 38th show of the tour. The band has two more shows remaining on Leg 1 of the “On with the Show” Tour, first a stop in Sunrise on Friday and the closing show in Tampa Bay on Saturday.

Stevie dedicated “Landslide” “for my father to all the beautiful women in Atlanta.”

[slideshow_deploy id=’33975′]

Videos

Special thanks to R Albert, cadon35, David Eckoff, LynnBerry, marykristalin, Jim Miller, and oldnitebaker for sharing these videos!

You Make Loving Fun (courtesy of R Albert)

Dreams (courtesy of R Albert)

Everywhere – short clip (courtesy of marykristalin)

I Know I’m Not Wrong (courtesy of Jim Miller)

Tusk (courtesy of R Albert)

Sisters of the Moon (courtesy of R Albert)

Say You Love Me (courtesy of R Albert)

Say You Love Me (courtesy of Jim Miller)

Seven Wonders (courtesy of Jim Miller)

Big Love – partial (courtesy of LynnBerry)

Landslide (courtesy of R Albert)

Never Going Back Again – partial (courtesy of oldnitebaker)

Over My Head (courtesy of R Albert)

Gypsy – intro (Jim Miller)

Gypsy (courtesy of R Albert)

Little Lies – partial (courtesy of oldnitebaker)

Gold Dust Woman (courtesy of R Albert)

Go Your Own Way (courtesy of R Albert)

World Turning (courtesy of cadon35)

World Turning – partial (courtesy of LynnBerry)

Don’t Stop (courtesy of R Albert)

Don’t Stop (courtesy of David Eckoff)

Silver Springs (courtesy of R Albert)

Songbird (courtesy of David Eckoff)

Mick’s closing remarks (courtesy of David Eckoff

Reviews

A fresh, fun Fleetwood Mac dazzles Atlanta (Atlanta Journal Constitution)

Set List

1. The Chain 13. Landslide
2. You Make Loving Fun 14. Never Going Back Again
3. Dreams 15. Over My Head
4. Second Hand News 16. Gypsy
5. Rhiannon 17. Little Lies
6. Everywhere 18. Gold Dust Woman
7. I Know I’m Not Wrong 19. I’m So Afraid
8. Tusk 20. Go Your Own Way
9. Sisters of the Moon 21. World Turning (encore 1)
10. Say You Love Me 22. Don’t Stop
11. Seven Wonders 23. Silver Springs
12. Big Love
Categories
2014-2015 On With the Show Tour Concert Reviews

REVIEW: Fresh, fun Fleetwood Mac dazzles Atlanta

Fleetwood Mac has never been considered a “fun” band.

Between the tempestuous relationships among its members and the differing opinions about musical direction over the decades, the collective of Mick Fleetwood, John McVie, Stevie Nicks, Christine McVie and Lindsey Buckingham was never the cheeriest bunch.

Christine McVie (Photo: Robb Cohen)
Christine McVie (Photo: Robb Cohen)

But wow, did that drama make for some amazing music.

The band returned to the road in October after taking some off late last year for John McVie to combat cancer, and this time they had a secret weapon that has elevated Fleetwood Mac to a new level of vitality – Christine McVie.

Back with the gang after a 16-year gap, McVie, an unbelievable-looking 71, injected a palpable energy into the band, both by allowing them to further open their songbook and by providing Nicks with her perfect female vocal foil.

Lindsey Buckingham (Photo: Robb Cohen)
Lindsey Buckingham (Photo: Robb Cohen)

When was the last time you heard Nicks girlishly squeal, as she did when welcoming McVie with an enthusiastic, “She’s baaaaaack!”? For that matter, when was the last time Mac fans heard “You Make Loving Fun” and “Everywhere” played live (OK, it was 1997’s “The Dance” tour, but you get the point)?

From the moment part-time artist Fleetwood ushered in the band’s standard opener “The Chain” with his heartbeat bass drum, to more than 2 ½-hours later when McVie closed the show with her tingly “Songbird,” the show felt fresh and alive and yes…fun.

The sold-out crowd at Philips Arena Wednesday night erupted into cheers for McVie before the complete opening phrase of “You Make Loving Fun” – “Sweet wonderful you” – exited her mouth, setting the appreciative tone of the night.

John McVie (Photo: Robb Cohen)
John McVie (Photo: Robb Cohen)

Of course, the other major benefit of McVie’s return is her contributions as a vocalist. She added another layer of harmony to the silky “Dreams,” steered the sunshiny “Everywhere” and helped “Rihannon” breathe as Nicks donned a black shawl to drape over her jagged-edge black dress as she sang an invigorated version of the song.

While the female energy on stage resounded mightily, that isn’t to diminish the continued awesomeness of the band’s tortured musical genius, Buckingham.

Whether bouncing on the balls of his feet during “Second Hand News” or unleashing primal yells during “Tusk” – the band’s most polarizing song that was balanced by Fleetwood’s unrelenting beat and Christine McVie on accordion – the Twizzler-thin Buckingham was a riveting presence who sounded robust after shaking off some initial hoarseness.

Mick Fleetwood and Lindsey Buckingham (Photo: Robb Cohen)
Mick Fleetwood and Lindsey Buckingham (Photo: Robb Cohen)

And what a hoot that at 65, he still has groupies who basked in his aura at the front of the stage and even requested a couple of his onstage towels.

By giving fans a well-paced, 24-song set, Fleetwood Mac was able to liberate its extensive catalog and demonstrate the differing tones each member brings to the forefront.

McVie’s sweet pop tendencies soared on “Say You Love Me,” Buckingham tore off a finger-blistering solo during “Big Love” that almost sounded symphonic and Nicks twirled and grinned during her ethereal “Gypsy,” after sharing a lengthy – yet interesting – story about its origin.

For a certain generation of Fleetwood Mac fans, the moments between Buckingham and Nicks prompt the greatest pangs of wistfulness. The twosome didn’t disappoint as they stood alone on stage for “Landslide,” with Nicks’ warble sounding poetically perfect and Buckingham’s gentle guitar strains lovely as always; the pair then stayed together for a hushed duet on “Never Going Back Again.”

Stevie Nicks (Photo: Robb Cohen)
Stevie Nicks (Photo: Robb Cohen)

With the full band back onstage (not that Buckingham ever leaves it), the easy-going, hip-shaking “Little Lies” led to Nicks’ defining moment of the show. She absolutely smoldered with sensuality as she snaked through “Gold Dust Woman,” saturating the song with an intensity not heard from her in years (the band’s 2013 appearance at Philips featured some fantastic moments, but none compared to this).

Eternal fan favorites “Go Your Own Way” – featuring Nicks in her traditional black top hat – and “Don’t Stop,” their anthem of cheerful optimism, provided the show with a final jolt, as did Fleetwood’s fluid drum solo in the middle of “World Turning.”

It’s almost a relief to know that Fleetwood Mac will be back at Philips Arena in March, because who wouldn’t want to see one of – if not the – best concert of the year one more time?

Yep, yesterday’s gone indeed and a new Mac has been born.

Melissa Ruggieri / Atlanta Journal Constitution / Thursday, December 18, 2014

 

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2014-2015 On With the Show Tour

VIDEO: Lindsey Buckingham talks to Tavis Smiley

Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Lindsey Buckingham talks about reuniting with the iconic band, Fleetwood Mac.

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2014-2015 On With the Show Tour

Paul ‘Arlo’ Guthrie talks lighting design

Lighting/production designer Paul “Arlo” Guthrie talks about lighting design, as Clay Paky Fixtures hit the road with Fleetwood Mac’s On With The Show Tour.

The iconic rock band Fleetwood Mac never stops thinking about tomorrow – and planning their next tour to delight fans. For their current “On With the Show” tour a complement of Clay Paky A.leda B-EYE K20 LED-based moving lights and Sharpy Wash lights have been specified by lighting designer/production designer Paul “Arlo” Guthrie.

The band launched the 40-city North American tour September 30 and, after playing to packed houses, added at least 28 more dates in a second leg, which will begin in January 2015. “On With the Show” marks the first full-member tour for Fleetwood Mac since 1997.

“Designing for Fleetwood Mac is always a challenge since you’re dealing with five different personalities,” says Guthrie. He began by giving them “the biggest, cleanest, most open stage set up I could, so every single seat in the house gets a clear view of the stage. I made sure to remove clutter so everyone can see the band members.”

Guthrie added a big upstage videowall, three above-the-head ribbon videowalls and 12 lighting pods.

A dozen B-EYE K20s are on the audience side of the pods to light the fans. “They do pixel effects and perform very quick, easy and huge washes from 12 watts – they can light the entire audience,” Guthrie says. “We don’t use smoke or haze so we don’t really use beam effects. But we do use a lot of pixel animation. For some songs the fixtures replicate what’s happening on the videowall.”

Guthrie was introduced to B-EYE K20s at LDI last year. “This is the first time I’m using them. The colors, dimming and patterns are great. The idea that we have 12 lights we can switch on and then light up the entire arena is great!”

“Designing for Fleetwood Mac is always a challenge since you’re dealing with five different personalities.”

Lighting Director Chris Lose adds, “The things that impressed me the most about the B-EYEs was their ability to act like an LED fixture and then with a simple flip of a channel behave just like an incandescent fixture. Most LED fixtures on the market are missing that warmth and glow.

Three Sharpy Washes are mounted on each pod for a total of 36 fixtures. “They serve as the workhorse overhead wash light,” Guthrie explains. “Because of their brightness we get a little bit of a beam effect even with no smoke. That’s a real bonus.”

Guthrie first used Sharpy Washes for Fleetwood Mac last year then subsequently deployed them for Nine Inch Nails. “I like the fact that they don’t dim like an LED: Their mechanical dimmer is fantastic. I like the size, speed and colors – it’s a great little workhorse light. There’s still room in my shows for lights that actually light stuff, and with Fleetwood Mac, we have to see the band and the stage, not just millions of pixels in your eyes.”

George Masek, A.C.T Lighting Vice President – Automated Lighting, commented “We really enjoy working with Arlo on his projects, and I’m very proud that he has chosen Clay Paky products to support his visions.”

Francesco Romagnoli, Clay Paky Area Manager for North and Latin America, added, “It’s great to see our newer lights employed for such an iconic band. Arlo and Chris are great talents and have truly put the fixtures to great use.”

A.C.T Lighting is the exclusive North American distributor for Clay Paky.

About Clay Paky
Headquartered in Seriate (Bergamo), Italy, Clay Paky SPA has a history of designing and manufacturing innovative professional show lighting. The company was founded in 1976 by entrepreneur Pasquale Quadri who anticipated the enormous impact the evolution of technology would have on the show and entertainment worlds.

For more information on Clay Paky products, please contact:
Francesco Romagnoli francesco@claypaky.it
Davide Barbetta webmaster@claypaky.it

Live Design Online / Wednesday, December 17, 2014

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2014-2015 On With the Show Tour

FMac to be featured on NBC ‘Toast to 2014’

Before the ball drops in Times Square, NBC will help ring in the New Year with “A Toast to 2014!,” a two hour primetime special airing Wednesday, December 31 at 8pm/7c, hosted by Kathie Lee Gifford and Hoda Kotb. Join the party on New Year’s Eve as NBC News presents a star-studded year-end look at the year’s buzziest stories, scandals, videos, trends and much more. The NBC Today Show interview with Fleetwood Mac will be included in the special recap.

Watch Preview of “A Toast to 2014!” Here: http://nbcnews.to/1waLTJC

From George Clooney and Kim Kardashian to “conscious uncoupling” and the ALS ice bucket challenge, “A Toast to 2014!” will revisit the biggest stories of the last year – including the good, the bad and the infamous. Hear from an all-star celebrity cast – from Chris Pratt and Debra Messing to BETHENNY Frankel, Russell Brand, Weird Al Yankovic and Miss Piggy – as they weigh in on 2014’s most memorable moments and mishaps. Celebrate the year that was and join the conversation on Twitter and Facebook using #Toast2014.

Interviews also include: Sherri Shepherd, William Shatner, Fleetwood Mac, Kris Jenner, Ian Ziering, Katherine Heigl, Alfre Woodward, Billy Bush, Monica Potter, Zach King, Charlie White and Meryl Davis, Matt Lauer, Savannah Guthrie, Al Roker, Natalie Morales, Lester Holt, Willie Geist, Jenna Bush Hager, Tamron Hall, Dylan Dreyer, Meredith Vieira, Catt Sadler, Bob Costas, Maria Menounos, Johnny Weir, Tara Lipinski and more.

BWW TV / Tuesday, December 16, 2014

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2014-2015 On With the Show Tour Concert Reviews

REVIEW: Refueled Fleetwood Mac truck delivers again

Putting on a show to match the grandeur and longevity of Fleetwood Mac is a massive undertaking, but Stevie Nicks needed just a minute to personalize it for the crowd of mostly Coloradans in the sold-out Pepsi Center on Dec. 12, 2014.

[slideshow_deploy id=’33594′]

“I have like a whole tribe here because one side of my family is all from Colorado,” Nicks said to a roaring audience in Denver. It was about an hour into the 35th performance of this “On With The Show” tour that marks the return of songbird/keyboardist Christine McVie to the stage — and the band — for the first time in 16 years.

Stevie Nicks sings”My great-great grandmother came across the Rocky Mountains in one of the last Indian massacres,” Nicks (left) added. “Seriously. And she crawled in the trunk (of a wagon train) and stayed there. And she was the only survivor. Strong woman.”

Nicks, who dedicated her tender “Landslide” to the 100 or so friends and family members — “my entire tribe” — in attendance, thus making the Colorado connection feel even stronger, certainly shares the strength of her ancestors.

McVie, Nicks and the male members of this lineup — frontman Lindsey Buckingham, Mick Fleetwood and John McVie (the pair for whom the band is named) — also possess those staunch survival instincts long after all coming together in 1975.

This stunning show was a perfect example of that willingness to sustain a coexistence, finally blessed with the valuable missing piece of the puzzle that turns an already priceless picture into a beautiful work of pop art.

The fact that a wild-eyed drummer and a couple of exes can keep that romantic spark an integral part of a crammed songbook long after the final flicker of hope in their relationships was extinguished makes such a transformative accomplishment even more endearing.

Fleetwood Mac had toured and made one studio album — 2003’s Say You Will — since Christine McVie’s departure in 1998 (the year of their Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction), but had to feel a hole in their collective heart while passing the time trying to keep the band alive and staying involved with other projects.

The McQuintet — bolstered on this tour by three female backing vocalists and two male musicians — made up for all that lost time by covering much of the material that shaped them into what they still are today — a supersonic supergroup.

Once a formidable British blues project, the Buckingham-Nicks addition for the eponymous Fleetwood Mac album got the popularity ball rolling in 1975. And that record was well-represented on this set list by “Landslide,” “Rhiannon,” “Say You Love Me,” “Over My Head” and “I’m So Afraid,” followed by an energetic “World Turning” during the energetic first encore.

The latter song was driven by Fleetwood’s five-minute drum solo with eye-bulging whoops and hollers — “Are you with me?” — and a few riveting samples that proves the band remains relevant in the 21st century.

Even though the age of this fivesome totals 338 years, they acted nothing like old-timers during what these days is considered a marathon concert — more than two and a half hours — without an intermission.

Sure, most of them took needed breaks, and consistently solid but subdued bassist John McVie (Fleetwood called him the “backbone of Fleetwood Mac”) looked somewhat drained the year after undergoing cancer treatments.

But Buckingham’s manic vitality — and virtuosic, sleight-of-hand performance on acoustic and electric guitars — kept the showmanship and spirit at a high level. His work clothes this pleasant Friday evening were black leather jacket and blue jeans. They offset the exotic garb of a dressed-in-black Nicks, whose beguiling voice, bewitching glances and come-hiter hand gestures kept the audience under her spell.

In a distinguished tone, Fleetwood praised each of his band mates while presenting the group that needs no introduction during the first encore, including backing vocalists Sharon Celani, Stevvi Alexander and Lori Nicks (who’s divorced from Stevie’s brother), along with guitarist Neale Heywood and Brett Tuggle (keyboards, guitars).

The drummer who helped launch this band in 1967 with Peter Green also made sure his current axman — “one helluva guitar player” — got his due, saying of Buckingham, “I don’t know whether you, ladies and gents, have noticed that this gentleman on my left has not even left the stage if but for 30 seconds this evening.”
Lindsey Buckingham was the only member onstage during the acoustic “Big Love,” which was one of several songs — including a rollicking “Tusk” (with Christine on accordion) and the marvelously rearranged “Never Going Back Again” — that ended with him raising his guitar and throwing kisses to the crowd.

Of “Big Love,” the powerful number from 1987’s Tango in the Night that was a first-half highlight, he said, “I think it’s interesting because even though it’s not really one of the earliest songs, it represents a time, the making of the album was at a time when I was about ready to make a turn and make some changes, some adjustments in my life. … It began as kind of a contemplation on alienation, and I think it’s now, for me, become more of a meditation on the power and importance of change.”

Nicks (dedicating “Seven Wonders” to the creators of American Horror Story “for taking that song and all of Fleetwood Mac’s music to 60 million people” during last season’s Coven episodes) and Christine McVie (“Everywhere” and “Little Lies”) also dove into Tango in the Night territory. But what kept most of the 18,000 or so spectators on their feet throughout the 24-song show were nine of the 11 selections from the 1977 landmark Rumours album, starting off with “The Chain.”

That was followed in quick succession by “You Make Loving Fun” (with some hearty cheers for those so pleased to hear the woman whose birth name — Christine Anne Perfect — still seems appropriate), “Dreams” and “Second Hand News.” (Christine McVie performs at left.)

Nicks brought out the gold shawl and the age-defying dance moves for an 11-minute version of “Gold Dust Woman,” while “Go Your Own Way” and “Don’t Stop” attracted the most group sing-along participants.

Following “Go Your Own Way,” the fab five shared hugs and took a bow, Nicks holding a black top hat and the dapper Fleetwood a bright red one that matched the color of his stylish shoes. Returning for the first encore, Buckingham gave Nicks and Christine McVie soft, sweet kisses before he moved back into his rightful place as Guitar God.

It was almost like 1997 — the year of The Dance tour — all over again, when these same core band members returned to the stage after a long absence to play most of these same songs and made a magical evening in Denver happen — only then it was at McNichols Sports Arena.

How many bands can outlive arena-sized venues while — almost 40 years later — remaining basically intact and managing such masterful musicianship? Then dare to return to that same venue in another four months?

Only a year ago, Nicks was uncertain about the band’s future, keeping her fingers crossed that John McVie (right) would get healthy and that Christine was tiring of a life of leisure after making a couple of cameo appearances in Dublin and London.

“If Christine decides she wants to do it again, she will,” Nicks said during our interview on Dec. 3, 2013, for an article that appeared later that week. “If she looks deeply into it herself and says, ‘Oh my God, another five years with what I just saw them do, I can’t do it.’ You just don’t know. It’s totally up to her.”

After the final notes were played on Dec. 12, 2014, the loquacious Nicks grabbed the mic one final time to tell the crowd they were responsible — along with all the other Fleetwood Mac fans in the world — for making Christine’s return to the fold last January a reality.

“They say if you throw a wish like that up into the universe, that the universe conspires to make that happen; and honest to God … on that one day, the universe said OK, and sent a message down to Christine. …

“And we got our girl back.”

So count on McVie and the rest of Fleetwood Mac to come back in 2015, when they’ll perform throughout North America again — including an April 1 show in Denver (tickets went on sale Dec. 15) — before heading to Europe in May.

How far can they go this time? Among the numerous testimonials for Christine McVie during one of the final shows of 2014 came a most passionate prediction by Buckingham:

“In this particular moment now, in this particular moment, with the return of the beautiful Christine, with her return, I believe that we begin a profound, poetic and a prolific new chapter in the history of this band.”
With that, he tore into “I Know I’m Not Wrong,” punctuated by a searing solo and an eardrum-splitting scream of joy.

Loud and proud rang true, of course, but the lovely back-to-back Mac sentiments delivered by Nicks on “Silver Springs” and Christine McVie on “Songbird” (fittingly taking its place again as the show’s grand finale) are what ultimately will make them an everlasting symbol of endurance.

“Time casts a spell on you, but you won’t forget me” and “the songbirds keep singing” have never sounded better.

Set list: Dec. 12, 2014, at the Pepsi Center, Denver

1. “The Chain”
2. “You Make Loving Fun”
3. “Dreams”
4. “Second Hand News”
5. “Rhiannon”
6. “Everywhere”
7. “I Know I’m Not Wrong”
8. “Tusk”
9. “Sisters of the Moon”
10. “Say You Love Me”
11. “Seven Wonders”
12. “Big Love”
13. “Landslide”
14. “Never Going Back Again”
15. “Over My Head”
16. “Gypsy”
17. “Little Lies”
18. “Gold Dust Woman”
19. “I’m So Afraid”
20. “Go Your Own Way”

ENCORE

21. “World Turning”
22. “Don’t Stop”
23. “Silver Springs”

SECOND ENCORE

24. “Songbird”

All photos by Michael Bialas. Click here to see more photos of Fleetwood Mac at the Pepsi Center in Denver.

Michael Bialas / Huffington Post / Tuesday, December 16, 2014

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2014-2015 On With the Show Tour Concert Reviews

REVIEW: Fleetwood Mac turns back time in nostalgic concert

With McVie in fine form, Fleetwood Mac turns back time in nostalgic concert.

Fleetwood Mac played to a sold-out adoring crowd at the Toyota Center on Monday night. Many in the audience saw the band on their 2013 World Tour in June. Our reviewer gave the concert a big thumbs-up, with a footnote that “Fleetwood Mac is not Fleetwood Mac without keyboardist/vocalist Christine McVie.”

This time around, a youthful looking 71-year-old McVie joined the band, and her energy and high spirits elevated the concert to another level.

(Photo: Jane Howze)
(Photo: Jane Howze)

Every time McVie took the lead, the crowd roared — and the band itself seemed delighted to have their “beautiful Christine” back. With good reason. She soared in a powerful “Say That You Love Me” and “Over My Head” and provided spirited keyboards on “Don’t Stop Thinking About Tomorrow.”

Playing for nearly three hours to a mostly older yet energetic crowd (this was not your Eagles audience who meekly followed orders to stay seated), Stevie Nicks, Lindsay Buckingham and McVie shared lead vocals. Opening with “The Chain” written by all five band members from the classic album Rumours, McVie then launched into “You Make Loving Fun.” Her lyrical and earthy alto made it clear that while Fleetwood Mac has held up amazingly well given their ages, McVie adds a richer and more nuanced sound.

(Photo: Jane Howze)
(Photo: Jane Howze)

Plus it allowed Nicks to harmonize and Buckingham to play his emotional guitar solos without having to be overly burdened with vocals.

Hits and cheering

With McVie back in the mix, the 24-song setlist shifted to songs recorded that they couldn’t perform without her in previous concerts. The hits and cheering never stopped.

Nicks’ version of “Rhiannon” in a lower key with a slightly different arrangement didn’t suit my taste. I’m not sure if the arrangement was because of her difficulty in hitting the high notes or was a way to mix it up. As she did at the last Houston concert, Nicks dedicated “Landslide” to a woman in the audience named Rhiannon who had survived a seemingly insurmountable health challenge.

(Photo: Jane Howze)
(Photo: Jane Howze)

After Nicks sang “Seven Wonders,” she gave a shout out to American Horror Story: Coven, in which she made a cameo and featured the song earlier this year.

Buckingham, the youngster in the group at age 65, was the only band member who didn’t leave the stage. Before launching into “Big Love,” he joked with someone in the front row that “you were not born when we wrote this song.”

Nicks was her usual hippie self with scarves, high heeled boots and flowing clothing reminiscent of the ’70s with a long (too long) anecdote about her early days of shopping in a store frequented by Grace Slick and Janice Joplin called The Velvet Underground. She urged young audience members to pursue their dreams and then launched into to an extended “Gypsy.” With “Gold Dust Woman” she donned a gold shawl and twirled as John McVie (Christine’s ex) and Buckingham showed their respective keyboard and guitar prowess. The song conjured up an almost psychedelic experience.

(Photo: Jane Howze)
(Photo: Jane Howze)

Other highlights included Buckingham on “I’m So Afraid” which brought an extended standing ovation after his show-stopping guitar solo and an energized “Don’t Stop Thinking About Tomorrow.”

The best surprise of the night was the second encore when a baby grand piano was rolled out for Christine McVie’s vulnerable and delicate “Songbird,” with Buckingham quietly backing her on guitar.

After the band took their final bow, Mick Fleetwood and Nicks returned (wearing a Christmas decoration on her head) to once again thank the fans, express happiness for having “young” Christine back in the band and wish everyone a Merry Christmas and, as Fleetwood said, “be kind to one another.”

(Photo: Jane Howze)
(Photo: Jane Howze)

For those who “can’t stop thinking about tomorrow,” Fleetwood Mac will be back in Houston March 3, 2015 for another concert.

Jane Howze / Culture Map / Tuesday, December 16, 2014

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2014-2015 On With the Show Tour

VIDEOS 12/15: Toyota Center, Houston

Fleetwood Mac performed at the Toyota Center in Houston on Monday night, the 37th show of the tour. The band has three more shows this week before winding down for the holidays. The second leg of the On With The Show Tour will kick off at the Xcel Energy Center in St Paul, Minneapolis on Friday, January 16.

Stevie dedicated “Landslide” to Rhiannon, a young woman who experienced medical adversity early in her life. “I’ve watched her grow up, and her name is Rhiannon. [The crowd cheers.] I know. She faced an amazing hell, [this] thing that she’s been fighting her whole life, and she’s just fought right through it, from this big [Stevie gestures low to the ground.] when I first met her. And she’s come right through it like this amazing woman that the mythological Rhiannon is and that this little Rhiannon is. So Rhiannon, this is for you tonight. This is ‘Landslide.'”

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The Mac's other members weren't shy about welcoming Christine McVie back into the fold. (Photo: Jack Gorman)
The Mac’s other members weren’t shy about welcoming Christine McVie back into the fold. (Photo: Jack Gorman)
Lindsey Buckingham: the higher the hair, the closer to God? (Photo: Jack Gorman)
Lindsey Buckingham: the higher the hair, the closer to God? (Photo: Jack Gorman)
Have Shawl, Will Travel: Stevie Nicks and Mick Fleetwood (back) (Photo: Jack Gorman)
Have Shawl, Will Travel: Stevie Nicks and Mick Fleetwood (back) (Photo: Jack Gorman)
(Photo: csnowden)
(Photo: csnowden)
(Photo: Jess and the Bandits)
(Photo: Jess and the Bandits)
(Photo: John Greeley)
(Photo: John Greeley)
(Photo: Pamela)
(Photo: Pamela)
(Photo: The Real Egger)
(Photo: The Real Egger)
(Photo: Toyota Center)
(Photo: Toyota Center)
(Photo: Trish Badger)
(Photo: Trish Badger)

Videos

Special thanks to Doug Garner, dylanelsie 9, and Space City Shows for sharing these videos!

The Chain (courtesy of Doug Garner)

The Chain (courtesy of Space City Shows)

You Make Loving Fun (courtesy of Space City Shows)

Dreams (courtesy of Space City Shows)

Second Hand News (courtesy of Space City Shows)

Rhiannon (courtesy of Space City Shows)

Everywhere (courtesy of Space City Shows)

I Know I’m Not Wrong (courtesy of Space City Shows)

Sisters of the Moon (courtesy of Space City Shows)

Say You Love Me (courtesy of Space City Shows)

Seven Wonders (courtesy of Space City Shows)

Big Love (courtesy of Space City Shows)

Landslide with dedication (courtesy of Space City Shows)

Never Going Back Again (courtesy of Space City Shows)

Over My Head (courtesy of Space City Shows)

Gypsy (courtesy of Space City Shows)

Little Lies (courtesy of Space City Shows)

Gold Dust Woman (courtesy of Space City Shows)

I’m So Afraid (courtesy of Space City Shows)

Go Your Own Way (courtesy of Space City Shows)

World Turning (courtesy of Space City Shows)

Don’t Stop (courtesy of Space City Shows)

Return for Encore 1 (courtesy of dylanelsie 9)

Silver Springs (courtesy of Space City Shows)

Songbird / Stevie’s closing speech (courtesy of Space City Shows)

Reviews

Fleetwood Mac thrills Toyota Center for two-plus hours (Houston Press)

Set List

1. The Chain 13. Landslide
2. You Make Loving Fun 14. Never Going Back Again
3. Dreams 15. Over My Head
4. Second Hand News 16. Gypsy
5. Rhiannon 17. Little Lies
6. Everywhere 18. Gold Dust Woman
7. I Know I’m Not Wrong 19. I’m So Afraid
8. Tusk 20. Go Your Own Way
9. Sisters of the Moon 21. World Turning (encore 1)
10. Say You Love Me 22. Don’t Stop
11. Seven Wonders 23. Silver Springs
12. Big Love 24. Songbird (encore 2)

Preshow Write-up

Why Fleetwood Mac Is Bigger Than Ever, Fleetwood Mac Music

Fleetwood Mac will be playing a very special show in Houston on Monday night. It’s special because it is the first time Christine McVie will be joining the band in a performance here since the early ’90s at least. For many younger fans, this is their first opportunity to see the band’s full classic lineup performing together.

And those younger fans? Well, there’s a lot of them — in fact, there may be more than ever. Against all odds, Fleetwood Mac has gone from a classic-rock band, relegated to bargain bins, to a thriving, relevant enterprise. Monday night’s show will be a celebration of that fact.
Of course, this has nothing to do with new music on the part of the band, or even anything particularly special they’ve done. Sure, it probably ignited a little bit of renewed interest when Stevie Nicks and all those witch rumors became a focal point of the last season of American Horror Story. But even then, Fleetwood Mac’s revival was rolling around beforehand.

It wasn’t releasing new music for the first time in a decade either. 2013’s Extended Play was Fleetwood Mac’s first newly released material since 2003’s Say You Will, a tepidly received album that missed the mark of their resurgence by years. While Extended Play was a welcome addition to their discography with some pretty solid songs on it, most younger fans probably never even noticed it came out.

No, the reason for their revival is indie rock and folk, which are massive these days. You can hardly go anywhere without hearing someone playing an acoustic guitar, once the sort of thing which was only ubiquitous in flashbacks to the long-forgotten era of hippies at parties noodling around on Beatles chords in clouds of weed smoke.

Bands like the Decemberists and City and Colour have brought Americana and folk into their indie-rock with astounding results. It’s practically a new genre, nothing like the indie rock of yesteryear, represented by bands like Pavement or Archers of Loaf. Much of it is indebted to one band, too: Fleetwood Mac.

The dual harmonies of Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks. The bluesy, roots guitar from Buckingham, combined with the band’s technical proficiency and tendency towards hard-rock breakdowns in their Americana jams. It’s all there plain to see on Rumours, the modern blueprint for how to make a record like this.

The esteem of Rumours has always been great. It is one of the most lauded and greatest-selling records of all time. But where this sound had once fallen into disfavor, relegated to your parents’ mixtapes while the kids were out breaking bottles and losing their shit to punk rock and metal, it has recently become cool again for the first time in 30 years.

A song like “The Chain” is so profoundly influential on a band like the Decemberists that one could almost accuse them of ripping it off. Even songs on their other records like “Landslide” have gone from your mom’s favorite song to a legendary ballad held in esteem by singer-songwriter indie rockers around the world.

Dare I say it, my generation has all but abandoned the distorted guitars and revolutionary attitudes of metal to embrace plaid shirts and beautiful chord melodies. In essence, this is the Fleetwood Mac generation. Almost every twentysomething I know now adores the band and their inestimable influence on modern rock music.

When Fleetwood Mac plays in Houston on Monday, it will be the first show in our city as a full lineup in at least 20 years. But it will also be the first show they’ve played in Houston where their audience will be so vastly mixed. This isn’t going to be a classic rock show where the average age of the audience member is middle-aged. It will be a legacy show, where everyone from teenagers to people in their thirties will congregate to pay their respects to the fore bearers of a genre.

The Mac is back, and bigger than ever.

Fleetwood Mac performs Monday, December 15 at Toyota Center, 1510 Polk. Doors open at 7 p.m.

Corey Deiterman / Houston Press / Friday, December 12, 2014

Categories
2014-2015 On With the Show Tour Concert Reviews

REVIEW: Fleetwood Mac thrills fans at Toyota Center

Fleetwood Mac thrills Fleetwood Mac fans new and old at Toyota Center for two-plus hours.

Fleetwood Mac
Toyota Center
December 15, 2014

The Mac Attack is Back! And with the Songbird back in the nest, the Chain has been reforged, and seems stronger than ever.

Okay, that may be a little heavy on the symbols and metaphors. But it’s hard to overestimate the importance the Fleetwood Mac’s return to its classic mid-’70s to mid-’80s lineup of Lindsey Buckingham (vocals/guitar), Stevie Nicks (vocals), namesake rhythm section Mick Fleetwood (drums) and John McVie (bass), and returning vocalist/keyboardist Christine McVie.

So many references were made by other band members onstage to McVie’s unlikely and never-thought-possible comeback after 16 years (she had retired to her English castle, vowing never to make music again), that no one would have blamed her for blushing, even nearly 40 dates into this reunion tour.

Lindsey Buckingham: the higher the hair, the closer to God? (Photo: Jack Gorman)
Lindsey Buckingham: the higher the hair, the closer to God? (Photo: Jack Gorman)

Every classic-rock band of any importance or longevity has gone through lineup changes — including Fleetwood Mac, whose origins stretch back to 1967 as a straight-up, all-English blues band. But there just seems something so…right about this lineup reconstituting. Take out any one of the five, and it’s just not the same.

And for more than 2.5 hours, Fleetwood Mac put on a vibrant, strident, joyous show that was no robotic walk through the Greatest Hits. And they had the sold-out Toyota Center shaking, with even most of those on the floor standing up for the bulk of the set.

Opening appropriately with the band-of-brothers-and-sister anthem “The Chain” to a rapturous welcome, the band played a seemingly never-ending string of favorites. The included a whopping nine of the 11 tracks from their career apex Rumours, and that album’s haunting B-side “Silver Springs.”

The Mac's other members weren't shy about welcoming Christine McVie back into the fold. (Photo: Jack Gorman)
The Mac’s other members weren’t shy about welcoming Christine McVie back into the fold. (Photo: Jack Gorman)

They also found set list space for a couple of deeper cuts from the more experimental 1979 double album Tusk (“I Know I’m Not Wrong,” “Sisters of the Moon”), possibly to the exclusion of bigger hits “Sara” and “Hold Me” from the set list. Other highlights included a slinky “Dreams,” buoyant “Say You Love Me,” and hard-charging “I’m So Afraid.” The band was augmented by three backup singers and two keyboardists/guitarists, tucked up on risers at the back of the stage.

Nicks dedicated a lush “Landslide” — performed by just her and Buckingham on guitar accompaniment — to a real-life Rhiannon in the audience who had/was facing some unexplained life challenge. She was likely not the only audience member either named for or conceived by that Tale of a Welsh Witch.

A handful of numbers were rejiggered from their album arrangements to great effect. Buckingham’s “Big Love” went from a more pop tune (with the orgiastic “oohs” and “aahs” of the chorus) into a howling, guitar-drenched cry of pain. Its author told the crowd that the track’s meaning for him had changed since its 1987 appearance on Tango in the Night.

“This song was about contemplation in alienation…and now it’s a meditation on the importance of change” he told the audience and — pointing to one close by younger member — “written before you were even born.”

Nicks’ cocaine elegy “Gold Dust Woman” turned into a far heavier, extended jam. It featured one of Nicks’ trademark stage twirls, all long blonde hair, scarves, and glittering shawl batwings. And while she pulled out her trademark stage moves more sparingly (being a 66-year-old in high heels and all), the audience went apeshit every time she turned.

This was no robotic walk through the greatest hits. (Photo: Jack Gorman)
This was no robotic walk through the greatest hits. (Photo: Jack Gorman)

She also turned out to be the night’s most chatty storyteller, introducing “Gypsy” with a mini-history lesson of her and Buckingham’s adventures first as teenagers in high school, then band partners in L.A. and San Francisco in the late ’70s, where the duo opened for acts like Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin and Chicago.

For all the romantic soap opera that has been the band’s history with its members being together, separated, divorced, and changing partners, it’s clear this particular pair still have an unshakeable bond between them that’s neither forced nor fake.

All five had a sinewy energy about them belling their chronological ages, especially the super lean Christine McVie (who Nicks said has been “working out with a trainer every day since February”) and stage-stalking Buckingham, both in skinny jeans.

There were, as expected, some concessions to age among the band’s three singers. Christine McVie’s voice is a bit sharper, sometimes removed from its warmer tones; Nicks’ is a bit more gravelly, and Buckingham worked to make his upper register.

But these are all minor observances, and in fact, actually add to the songs, making them more lived-in and reflective of history.

When Nicks offered the wistful line “But time makes you bolder/ Even children get older/ And I’m getting older too” on “Landslide” (written in 1973!), it clearly struck a chord with both band and audience. And the vocals could have actually been turned up a bit higher in the mix throughout the show.

A slowed-down “Never Going Back Again” brought some more regret into the lyrics. And even Buckingham’s well-worn kiss-off “Go Your Own Way” had a visceral power live that belied its FM-radio overplaying. [Note: this paragraph has been edited after publication.]

The evening came to a close with a rousing “Don’t Stop,” though one can’t help by mentally picture a certain political power couple with the track playing now, and an elegant, heartbreaking “Silver Springs.” Then, fittingly, Christine McVie returned to a grand piano to play the strains of “Songbird.”

In it, the avian of the title “knows the score.” And the score – brought home with Nicks and Fleetwood’s touchingly personal post-song address to the audience about the current reformation – is that the band has started a new chapter in its ever-unfolding book.

The quintet are already working on new material for an upcoming studio album, and a second Houston date has been added for March 3 of next year. Get your tickets…now.

Personal Bias: Longtime fan, and not just of this lineup. And I credit seeing a Mac show in Austin in the late ’80s (sans Buckingham, but with Rick Vito and Billy Burnette) with starting me on a music-journalism path.

The Crowd: Wider-range of ages than most classic-rock shows, from twentysomethings to sixtysomethings. A handful of shawled Stevie wannabes; Lots of couples.

Overheard in the Crowd: “I hope they do ‘Sara,’ but they probably won’t. It’s not a song really meant for concerts.”

Random Notebook Dump: Lindsey’s high, brillo hair is looking more Art Garfunkelesque all the time.

SET LIST

The Chain
You Make Loving Fun
Dreams
Second Hand News
Rhiannon
Everywhere
I Know I’m Not Wrong
Tusk
Sisters of the Moon
Say You Love Me
Seven Wonders
Big Love
Landslide
Never Going Back Again
Over My Head
Gypsy
Little Lies
Gold Dust Woman
I’m So Afraid
Go Your Own Way

ENCORE
World Turning (w/Fleetwood drum solo)
Don’t Stop
Silver Springs

ENCORE 2
Songbird

Bob Ruggiero / Houston Press / Tuesday, December 16, 2014

Categories
2014-2015 On With the Show Tour Concert Reviews

REVIEW: Toyota Center crowd has lovin’ fun with FMac

Never underestimate the power of the Mac.

Three songs into Monday night’s set at Toyota Center, Stevie Nicks promised the crowd she would “get this party started!” Until then, Fleetwood Mac had been pleasing and mostly polite: anthem-ic kickoff “The Chain,” “You Make Loving Fun,” “Dreams” shifted to a lower key.

But something kicked into gear with “Second Hand News.” Lindsey Buckingham ripped into the song, all wild eyes and stomping feet. It reverberated through the sold-out crowd and energized Nicks’ take on “Rhiannon.” The party had indeed started.

Christine McVie, who rejoined the band after a 15-year absence, was still soulful and sweet on “Everywhere,” which benefited from a punchy arrangement.

“Now she’s been here, and it’s almost 40 shows. And now I think she’s gonna stay,” Nicks quipped. The band returns in March for another Toyota Center show.

The enduring allure of Fleetwood Mac has been the story behind the music. The core unit Buckingham, Nicks, John McVie, Christine McVie and Mick Fleetwood – has continued to thrive both in spite and because of its tempestuous history.

Buckingham played up the sentiment, saying the band’s success is its ability “to continue to prevail through the good times and the bad.” He called Christine McVie’s reappearance “the beginning of a poetic, a profound and a beautiful new chapter.”

For now, though, it was about the music.

Nicks introduced “Gypsy” with a lengthy story about meeting Buckingham, shopping for rock-star clothes and opening shows for Jimi Hendrix, Santana and Creedence Clearwater Revival.

“Are you listening over there?” she asked him.

And, yes, something sweet and magical still happens when Nicks’ croons about getting older and snow-covered hills during “Landslide.” The entire venue seemed to sigh in unison.

Joey Guerra / Houston Chronicle / Tuesday, December 15, 2014

Categories
2014-2015 On With the Show Tour

VIDEOS 12/14: American Airlines Center, Dallas

Fleetwood Mac performed at the American Airlines Center in Dallas on Sunday night, the 36th show of the tour.

Stevie dedicated “Landslide” to her friend Nicky Young, who was in the Dallas crowd.

Videos

Special thanks to Dallas Daniels, deserage, dylanelsie 9, Bruno Giraldo, joncgif12, and wheredatbass for sharing these videos!

(Photo: Alexa)
(Photo: Alexa)
(Photo: BN82)
(Photo: BN82)
(Photo: Dave Plymale)
(Photo: Dave Plymale)
(Photo: Jason Janik)
(Photo: Jason Janik)
(Photo: Jason Janik)
(Photo: Jason Janik)

The Chain (courtesy of deserage)

Dreams (courtesy of Bruno Giraldo)

Everywhere (courtesy of Bruno Giraldo)

Tusk (courtesy of wheredatbass)

Landslide with dedication (courtesy of Bruno Giraldo)

Landslide (courtesy of Bruno Giraldo)

Landslide (courtesy of Dallas Daniels)

Lindsey chats with fans before Gypsy (courtesy of dylanelsie 9)

Gold Dust Woman (courtesy of wheredatbass)

Go Your Own Way (courtesy of Bruno Giraldo)

Return to stage for World Turning (courtesy of dylanelsie 9)

Don’t Stop (courtesy of joncgif12)

Reviews

Fully-staffed Fleetwood Mac takes adoring Dallas crowd on a roller coaster ride (Dallas Morning News)

Set List

1. The Chain 13. Landslide
2. You Make Loving Fun 14. Never Going Back Again
3. Dreams 15. Over My Head
4. Second Hand News 16. Gypsy
5. Rhiannon 17. Little Lies
6. Everywhere 18. Gold Dust Woman
7. I Know I’m Not Wrong 19. I’m So Afraid
8. Tusk 20. Go Your Own Way
9. Sisters of the Moon 21. World Turning (encore 1)
10. Say You Love Me 22. Don’t Stop
11. Seven Wonders 23. Silver Springs
12. Big Love 24. Songbird (encore 2)
Categories
2014-2015 On With the Show Tour Concert Reviews

REVIEW: Fleetwood Mac takes Dallas crowd on fun ride

Fully-staffed Fleetwood Mac takes adoring Dallas crowd on a roller-coaster ride at American Airlines show.

Fleetwood Mac comprises former lovers, ex spouses, longtime friends and a tumultuous biography. Like any musical group that has survived decades of ups and downs, the members must constantly work at it to recapture their old chemistry.

That workmanlike spirit helped to define the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame band’s sold-out show on Sunday night at American Airlines Center. Rejoined by vital vocalist and keyboardist Christine McVie after her 16-year-touring hiatus, the Mac leaned in admirably through a two-hour-plus performance that veered from soul-soothing to serviceable and back again.

Understandably, much fanfare was made of McVie’s return: Her warm, familiar vocals provided several highlights, from the smoky seduction of “You Make Loving Fun” to the melodic bliss of ’80s smashes “Everywhere” and “Little Lies.” Despite her solid performance, McVie was never one to bask in the spotlight.

Stevie Nicks and Lindsey Buckingham, however, were more than happy to soak up the love of the audience on Sunday. With McVie on keys, her ex-husband, John, on bass and Mick Fleetwood behind his drums for most of the evening, it was up to the group’s two relative “newbies” to do the crowd work.

Guitarist Lindsey Buckingham of Fleetwood Mac (Jason Janik)
Guitarist Lindsey Buckingham of Fleetwood Mac (Jason Janik)

Buckingham kept the folks up front entertained by harnessing a twenty-something’s energy, frequently screaming out lyrical lines and jumping into rock-god postures. Nicks was simply herself — a twirling and swaying mystical sage armed with raspy power pipes and a streamer-clad tambourine.

When the band took the stage to kick things off with “The Chain,” the entire arena leapt to its feet and folks around me were pointing out Nicks to each other (“There she is!”). The three vocalists, embellished by a set of backup singers, took a full verse and chorus to fully find their harmonic sweet spot.

Nicks continued to get better and better throughout the night, at first avoiding the highest notes on “Dreams” and “Rhiannon,” but later reaching the mountaintops on “Gypsy” and the spine-tingling classic, “Gold Dust Woman.” She and Buckingham shined during what was essentially an intermission for the rest of the band — a three-song mini-set consisting of “Big Love,” “Landslide” and “Never Going Back Again.” All spotlighted Buckingham’s acoustic finger-picking skills, while the middle song benefited from Nicks’ refreshingly unsentimental vocal delivery.

As other legacy bands are wont to do, Fleetwood Mac’s players introduced a few of their songs by recalling elements of the band’s backstory. Nicks charmed while explaining the origins of the first line of “Gypsy.” Buckingham spoke to how certain tunes’ meanings have changed for him over the years. McVie got the biggest laugh of the evening while introducing “Over My Head”: “This goes back to the days when John and I were still married. Remember that, John?”

Thirty or so dates into their current tour, now might be a good time for the Mac to consider making a few edits. For instance, unnecessary drum and guitar solos during “I’m So Afraid” significantly slowed down the pace toward the end of the show, a point when most acts would try to speed it up. And then came another odd drum solo during the encore set. Fleetwood shut his eyes, played a variety of rhythms and screamed at the crowd like a madman — it seemed indulgent, even if it might have given folks one more chance to hit the beer stands.

My few complaints probably won’t register with diehard fans of Fleetwood Mac. Anyone who delights in the band’s unique blend of creative voices would have been thrilled to hear Buckingham toast “a poetic, profound and prolific new chapter” from the stage.

A new album is expected next year, as well as a second leg of the On With the Show tour (it returns to AAC on March 4). If that means I’ll get to see Nicks twirl in the shadows one more time, sign me up.

Hunter Hauk / Dallas Morning News / Monday, December 15, 2014

Categories
2014-2015 On With the Show Tour Concert Reviews

REVIEW: Fleetwood Mac at the Pepsi Center in Denver

Christine McVie always performed stage right with Fleetwood Mac, though she was never a side player. The keyboardist wrote a good number of the band’s hits back in the day and took the position of lead singer whenever they came into rotation.

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More than that, she was the supergroup’s third leg. Lindsey Buckingham was the rocker, Stevie Nicks the spiritual siren and McVie the pop songstress who brought a head-bopping bounce to the band’s sound with numbers like “You Make Loving Fun.” That combination gave Fleetwood Mac something for every prevailing taste in the 1970s and pushed it to the top of the charts.

And so when Christine McVie returned to the band after a 17-year vacation this fall, she brought not just her 71-year-old self, but also a little more easy-going fun. Fleetwood Mac’s appearance at the Pepsi Center in Denver Friday night felt much more like a pop concert than the raucous rock show it performed there in 2013.

Buckingham still did his high-jumps during “Big Love” and tortured his guitar until it screamed during “Tusk.” Nicks still growled through “Rhiannon” and danced and ​twirled​ in a sparkly shawl for “Gold Dust Woman.”

But there was also McVie, leaning into her mike and dropping those famously moony vocals on “Over My Head” and “Say You Love Me.” She took center stage for “Everywhere” and delivered the song’s happy, little trademark “boops” at the end with precision.

For the band, and the virtually sold-out crowd, it felt like home. There was McVie in her skin tight black jeans, Buckingham in his leather jacket, Nicks in her multiple layers of skirts and coats and those fingerless lace gloves. In the background, Mick Fleetwood banged his drums too hard like he has for four decades and John McVie plucked away on bass nearly invisible, except for a bright red vest. This was Fleetwood Mac as it was meant to be; the group, fully formed, that sold 100 million albums.

That not to say it was all nostalgia. The ensemble sounded tight and all the players brought what they had to. Nicks, who can have difficult nights, started strong and stayed relaxed. McVie lived up to the hype of her return, which was mentioned non-stop during the show. She was never the frantic type and that suits her well in her advanced years. Late in the game, the energy slowed, but that happens to a lot of bands on the 30th stop of a tour that offers few real breaks for musicians.

There were times when the proceedings felt programmed. The song list wasn’t all that different from June 2013 and neither were the renditions. The set and lights see ​med​ like an afterthought, with a series of distracting shapes projected ​through​ the giant monitor backstage — swirling bubbles, seashells and planets that looked more like screen savers for a home computer than the backdrop of an arena show.

But, of course, there was plenty to look without all that: Three of the world’s biggest music stars, trading off their best material. There wasn’t a huge amount of lovey dovey stuff between them, just a few sideways glances and one cute wink from Stevie to Christine during “Say You Love Me.”

They were co-workers whose best team was back together, with McVie stage right once again. They gave her the closer, leaving her alone with a spotlight for a gentle take on “Songbird.” She sounded comfortable to be back, and the fans, with their phones lit in a bright ovation, seems pleased as well.

Follow our news and updates on Twitter, our relationship status on Facebook and our search history on Google +. Or send us a telegram.

Ray Mark Rinaldi is a Arts and Entertainment writer and critic at The Denver Post and a regular contributor to Reverb.

Daniel Petty is a Denver-based photographer and digital director of sports at The Denver Post.

Ray Mark Rinaldi / Reverb / December 13th, 2014

Categories
2014-2015 On With the Show Tour

VIDEOS 12/12: Pepsi Center, Denver

Fleetwood Mac performed at the Pepsi Center in Denver on Friday night, the 35th show of the massively successful ON WITH THE SHOW tour. The band has five shows remaining on Leg 1 of the tour, before winding down for the holidays and winter break.

Stevie Nicks and Lindsey Buckingham rock "The Chain" at the Pepsi Center in Denver. (Photo: Daniel Petty)
Stevie Nicks and Lindsey Buckingham rock “The Chain” at the Pepsi Center in Denver. (Photo: Daniel Petty)
Lindsey Buckingham dazzles the crowd with one of many blistering guitar solos at the Pepsi Center in Denver. (Photo: Michael Krieger)
Lindsey Buckingham dazzles the crowd with one of many blistering guitar solos at the Pepsi Center in Denver. (Photo: Michael Krieger)
Christine McVie delights fans in Denver. (Photo: Daniel Petty)
Christine McVie delights fans in Denver. (Photo: Daniel Petty)
Stevie Nicks welcomes the Denver crowd. (Photo: Daniel Petty)
Stevie Nicks welcomes the Denver crowd. (Photo: Daniel Petty)
Fleetwood Mac rocks the Pepsi Center in Denver. (Photo: Daniel Petty)
Fleetwood Mac rocks the Pepsi Center in Denver. (Photo: Daniel Petty)

Videos

Special thanks to Marlo Goff, Katherine Pilafas, and Danielle Trumble for sharing these videos!

The Chain – partial (courtesy of Katherine Pilafas)

Landslide (courtesy of Marlo Goff)

Go Your Own Way – short clip (courtesy of Danielle Trumble)

Set List

1. The Chain 13. Landslide
2. You Make Loving Fun 14. Never Going Back Again
3. Dreams 15. Over My Head
4. Second Hand News 16. Gypsy
5. Rhiannon 17. Little Lies
6. Everywhere 18. Gold Dust Woman
7. I Know I’m Not Wrong 19. I’m So Afraid
8. Tusk 20. Go Your Own Way
9. Sisters of the Moon 21. World Turning (encore 1)
10. Say You Love Me 22. Don’t Stop
11. Seven Wonders 23. Silver Springs
12. Big Love 24. Songbird (encore 2)

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Categories
2014-2015 On With the Show Tour

VIDEOS 12/10: US Airways Center, Phoenix

Fleetwood Mac performed at the US Airways Center in Phoenix on Wednesday, the band’s 34th show of the tour.

Both Stevie and Lindsey spoke affectionately about the city where Stevie’s parents lived and the two spent a lot of time early in their career. Lindsey called Phoenix a “second home” and Stevie expressed regret for selling her beautiful home near Camelback Mountain, where she wrote many songs. Stevie later dedicated “Landslide” to the Phoenix audience, saying “it’s good to be home,” and delivered an especially poignant rendition of her late father’s favorite song.

Photos

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Videos

Special thanks to 9693297602 ., Traci Baker, Dan B, mattjohnson723, and Ron Orion for sharing these videos!

COMPILATION: The Chain / Second Hand News / Rhiannon / Landslide / Gypsy / Gold Dust Woman / Go Your Own Way / Silver Springs (mattjohnson723)

Second Hand News (Traci Baker)

Everywhere (9693297602 .)

I Know I’m Not Wrong (9693297602 .)

Tusk (9693297602 .)

Seven Wonders (9693297602 .)

Big Love (9693297602 .)

Landslide (Dan B)

Never Going Back Again (9693297602 .)

Gypsy (9693297602 .)

Little Lies (9693297602 .)

Gold Dust Woman (9693297602 .)

Go Your Own Way (9693297602 .)

World Turning (9693297602 .)

World Turning / Band introductions (Ron Orion)

Don’t Stop (Ron Orion)

Silver Springs (9693297602 .)

Silver Springs – video is sideways (Ron Orion)

Songbird (9693297602 .)

Songbird (Ron Orion)

Songbird (Tina Zouppas)

Reviews

Fleetwood Mac celebrates Christine McVie’s return (Arizona Republic)

Set List

1. The Chain 13. Landslide
2. You Make Loving Fun 14. Never Going Back Again
3. Dreams 15. Over My Head
4. Second Hand News 16. Gypsy
5. Rhiannon 17. Little Lies
6. Everywhere 18. Gold Dust Woman
7. I Know I’m Not Wrong 19. I’m So Afraid
8. Tusk 20. Go Your Own Way
9. Sisters of the Moon 21. World Turning (encore 1)
10. Say You Love Me 22. Don’t Stop
11. Seven Wonders 23. Silver Springs
12. Big Love 24. Songbird (encore 2)
Categories
2014-2015 On With the Show Tour Concert Reviews

REVIEW: Fleetwood Mac celebrates Christine McVie’s return

“Our songbird has returned,” Mick Fleetwood told the sold-out crowd at Talking Stick Resort Arena Wednesday night before the reunited “Rumours” lineup treated the fans to an encore performance of “Don’t Stop” that featured the songbird in question, Christine McVie, taking a turn on lead vocals and contributing a rollicking piano solo.

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This is McVie’s first tour with Fleetwood Mac since 1998. And Fleetwood was far from alone in viewing her return as cause for celebration, reuniting as it does the soft-rock icons’ most successful lineup. The crowd responded with enthusiasm when she took her first lead vocal, two songs in, on “You Make Loving Fun,” which was followed by a heartfelt tribute to McVie by Stevie Nicks.

McVie herself talked about “what a thrill it is for me to be standing on this stage singing with these amazing musicians and friends” before taking another lead vocal on “Everywhere.”

Lindsey Buckingham shared his thoughts on how “the return of the beautiful Christine” had signaled a new chapter in their history.

And the second encore started with McVie alone on piano and vocals for two verses and a chorus of an understated “Songbird” before Buckingham joined in on lead guitar.

That was it for the music, but Nicks returned to share a charming anecdote about a phone call she got last October in Italy, imitating McVie’s British accent to ask, “What would you think if I decided to come back to the band?” and ending her speech with “We so wanted her to come back. And we’re so happy to have our girl back.”

They did a lot of talking in the course of their nearly three-hour performance. Buckingham talked about how thrilled he was to be in Phoenix, where he and Nicks had spent a lot of time, saying “It kind of feels like a second home.” He gave a lengthy monologue before tearing it up on a solo acoustic performance of “Big Love,” talking about how although that “Tango in the Night” track is actually newer than much of the material in Wednesday’s set, it feels like it came from “a whole different lifetime,” before he “pulled back and made a few adjustments.” The song began, he explained, as “a kind of contemplation on alienation perhaps” but had become “more a meditation on the power and the importance of change.”

And Nicks talked at length about living in Phoenix.

“I actually lived here for 20 years,” she said before admitting that she wished she hadn’t sold her house. “I miss coming home to write and being near Camelback Mountain and all of you.” After acknowledging her friends and family in attendance, Nicks said, “A lot of our songs were written here. It’s good to be home.” And after talking about McVie in the second encore, she signed off with “And Phoenix, I’m so sorry I don’t live here anymore.”

As for the music, they made their way through nine of the 11 songs on “Rumours” and half the songs on 1975’s “Fleetwood Mac,” their first release with Buckingham and Nicks.

Fleetwood set the tone for their performance with the thumping kick drum of “The Chain,” the first of several tracks that thrived on Buckingham’s intensity both as a singer and as one of rock and roll’s most underrated lead guitarists. The man should be enshrined in the Rock and Roll Hall of Most Watchable Guitar Gods. His tone is amazing and his presence makes his most electrifying moments that much more electrifying. The excitement he seems to be feeling when he plays those leads couldn’t be more contagious.

They kept the focus on “Rumours” as they traded off lead vocals from McVie on “You Make Loving Fun” to Nicks on “Dreams” and back to Buckingham for “Second Hand News.”

Highlights of the early part of their performance included “Rhiannon,” an electrifying “Tusk,” which was accompanied by footage of the USC Trojan Marching Band playing the song at Dodgers Stadium, “Say You Love Me” and “Seven Wonders.”

Buckingham’s solo performance of “Big Love” was exhilarating and far more intense than you’d imagine one man on acoustic guitar can be — unless, of course, you were familiar with Buckingham’s solo performances of that awe-inspiring song. They kept things in acoustic mode for “Landslide,” which featured Buckingham accompanying Nicks on her best vocal of the night. And then he took it up a notch with a haunting performance of “Never Going Back Again.”

At that point, their bandmates returned for a stripped-down set with Fleetwood on a kit out front for “Over My Head” and “Gypsy,” which was set up by another lengthy monologue from Nicks about a San Francisco dress shop called the Velvet Underground.

The set built to a climax from there with McVie’s “Little Lies” giving way to a haunted arrangement of Nicks’ “Gold Dust Woman,” Buckingham’s most insane guitar work of the concert on “I’m So Afraid” and a set-closing “Go Your Own Way.”

After starting the encore with a version of “World Turning” that featured a lengthy drum solo, they brought things up a notch with “Don’t Stop,” ending that first encore with an aching “Silver Spring” (the B-side of “Go Your Own Way”) with a really nice vocal from Nicks. And saving “Songbird” for the second encore was a nice touch, shining the spotlight one last time on the prodigal daughter, McVie, whose return really does suggest, as Buckingham said, a new chapter in Fleetwood Mac’s history.

Setlist

1. “The Chain”

2. “You Make Loving Fun”

3. “Dreams”

4. “Second Hand News”

5. “Rhiannon”

6. “Everywhere”

7. “I Know I’m Not Wrong”

8. “Tusk”

9. “Sisters of the Moon”

10. “Say You Love Me”

11. “Seven Wonders”

12. “Big Love”

13. “Landslide”

14. “Never Going Back Again”

15. “Over My Head”

16. “Gypsy”

17. “Little Lies”

18. “Gold Dust Woman”

19. “I’m So Afraid”

20 “Go Your Own Way”

Encore

21. “World Turning”

22. “Don’t Stop”

23. “Silver Springs”

Encore 2

24. “Songbird”

Ed Masley / Arizona Republic / Thursday, December 11, 2014

Categories
2014-2015 On With the Show Tour Concert Reviews

REVIEW: Fleetwood Mac, The Forum, Dec 6

Fleetwood Mac
The Forum
December 6, 2014

On Saturday, Fleetwood Mac played their last of three sold-out shows at the Forum. And who cares, right? Reunion tours at the Inglewood arena are as plentiful as scarves on Stevie Nicks’ mic stand.

But in the 16 years since a Fleetwood Mac tour featured the entire Rumors lineup, something notable happened: The band, long a favorite among baby boomers and Gen X’ers, got discovered by a new generation of fans, many of whom are themselves making emotionally dramatic pop music laced with lush harmonies and fiery guitar parts.

Tame Impala, Haim, the Entrance Band, even Miley Cyrus: all have worshiped at the altar of the Mac. Foxygen told L.A. Weekly that they recorded their new album while listening to Tusk on repeat, and Best Coast’s Bethany Cosentino breathlessly tweeted out “Fleetwood Mac is honestly THE most important band in my entire life” after one of the band’s first two Forum shows.

So Saturday’s show — not their last in L.A., as we had originally described it, since they announced an additional Forum date next April just a few days ago — felt important. With the return of singer/keyboardist Christine McVie, Fleetwood Mac are now the biggest band of their era whose “classic” lineup remains intact. And they’ve become, arguably, the most influential.

Photo by Timothy Norris Christine McVie The importance of McVie’s return can’t be overstated. Though far less flashy than her fellow lead singers, Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks, her cool alto, underrated piano skills and flair for an irresistible pop hook provided the perfect foil to Buckingham’s histrionics and Nicks’ witchy balladry. She wrote the first and last hit singles of the quintet’s remarkable 12-year run (“Over My Head” and “Everywhere,” respectively) as well as their signature anthem, “Don’t Stop.” More than once, her bandmates expressed elation over her return — though no words could convey more than the ear-to-ear grin Buckingham wore for much of “Say You Love Me,” one of Christine’s most indelible tunes and perhaps the evening’s best showcase of the band’s pinpoint harmonies.

(Photo: Timothy Norris)
(Photo: Timothy Norris)

Though the night in many ways belonged to McVie, Buckingham and Nicks still provided most of the highlights. After nearly 40 years, Buckingham remains the band’s wild card, a guitarist so brilliant — and so clearly enamored of his own brilliance — that his admittedly jaw-dropping solos at times threatened to hijack the whole show. The shrieking cascades of notes pouring forth from his signature Renaissance Model One guitar earned their fair share of cheers from the crowd — but no moment of the show got a bigger cheer than Stevie Nicks’ first twirl during “Rhiannon.”

It is Nicks, more than any other member of the Mac, who has captured the imagination of a younger generation of fans. During her songs “Dreams,” “Gypsy” and especially “Landslide,” women who clearly weren’t even born when Rumors came out could be seen throughout the crowd, singing along rapturously with every word.

Wisely and graciously, the band let Christine McVie have the last word, rolling out a baby grand piano on which she delivered a haunting rendition of “Songbird,” the prettiest song on Rumors, accompanied only by some admirably restrained acoustic guitar by Buckingham.

Afterward, when the band came out to take their final bows, Stevie Nicks credited Fleetwood Mac’s fans for McVie’s return. “You made this happen. You’re magic! You have magical powers,” Nicks declared. And maybe she’s right, but our magical powers pale in comparison to those of a reunited Fleetwood Mac.

Overheard in the crowd, after Stevie Nicks’ twirling performance of “Rhiannon”: “She knows how to work a shawl.”

Random notebook dump: The giant floating Lindsey head on the projection screen during “I Know I’m Not Wrong” is freaking me out. It’s like his ego made manifest.

Andy Hermann / LA Weekly / Monday, December 8, 2014 

Categories
2014-2015 On With the Show Tour

VIDEOS 12/7: Honda Center, Anaheim

Fleetwood Mac returned to Southern California on Sunday night, performing at the Honda Center in Anaheim, the band’s 33rd show of the tour.

Stevie dedicated “Landslide” to a Cecilia Bellissimo, a young girl who overcame a rare form of cancer.

Photos

Fleetwood Mac, Honda Center, Anaheim, December 7, 2014
(Photo: Craig Benedetto)
Fleetwood Mac, Honda Center, Anaheim, December 7, 2014
(Photo: Classic FLL Radio)
Fleetwood Mac, Honda Center, Anaheim, December 7, 2014
(Photo: Andy B)

Videos

Special thanks to  allie3466, CindyR90, Zoe Golightly, jitsu1109, and Kelly L.R. Koczkur for sharing these videos!

COMPILATION: Dreams / Rhiannon / Big Love / Landslide / Gold Dust Woman / Go Your Own Way / Don’t Stop (courtesy of Zoe Golightly)

Second Hand News – partial clip (courtesy of CindyR90)

Rhiannon – partial clip (courtesy of CindyR90)

Everywhere (courtesy of CindyR90)

I Know I’m Not Wrong (courtesy of jitsu1109)

Landslide with dedication (courtesy of Kelly L.R. Koczkur)

Over My Head (courtesy of Kelly L.R. Koczkur)

Gold Dust Woman – partial clip (courtesy of allie3466)

Go Your Own Way (courtesy of CindyR90)

Silver Springs – partial clip (courtesy of allie3466)

Songbird (courtesy of Kelly L.R. Koczkur)

Set List

1. The Chain 13. Landslide
2. You Make Loving Fun 14. Never Going Back Again
3. Dreams 15. Over My Head
4. Second Hand News 16. Gypsy
5. Rhiannon 17. Little Lies
6. Everywhere 18. Gold Dust Woman
7. I Know I’m Not Wrong 19. I’m So Afraid
8. Tusk 20. Go Your Own Way
9. Sisters of the Moon 21. World Turning (encore 1)
10. Say You Love Me 22. Don’t Stop
11. Seven Wonders 23. Silver Springs
12. Big Love 24. Songbird (encore 2)
Categories
2014-2015 On With the Show Tour

VIDEOS 12/6: The Forum, Inglewood (3)

Fleetwood Mac made a third stop at The Forum in Inglewood, California, on Saturday night, performing the band’s 32nd show of the tour. The Forum show attracted celebrities such as actor Eric Dane and Fleetwood Mac Rumours producer Ken Caillat (father of singer-songwriter Colbie Caillat), who made their presence at the show known on social media.

Stevie dedicated “Landslide” to her good friend Kim Brakley, one of Stevie’s past “wardrobe mistresses.” “I’m so thrilled she is back in my life. Kim, I want you to know that. Please never go away again because people like you are so hard to find in the world that we live in. So this is for my friend Kim Brakley. This is ‘Landslide.'” Stevie last acknowledged Brakley in the liner notes of Stevie’s fourth solo album The Other Side of the Mirror (1989).

Videos

Special thanks to our LA rock stars — Joe Carson, Hana Dahl, HarlJHogg, Kelly L.R. Koczkur, Majestic Entertainment, Ryan Martin, Michelle Mathisen, Veri Salvador, Stephen Silvagni, and Jen Woodard — for sharing these videos!

COMPILATION CLIPS: The Chain / I Know I’m Not Wrong / Tusk / Say You Love Me / Big Love / Landslide / Little Lies / Gold Dust Woman / Go Your Own Way (courtesy of Hana Dahl)

The Chain – partial clip (courtesy of Kelly L.R. Koczkur)

Second Hand News (courtesy of Kelly L.R. Koczkur)

Rhiannon (courtesy of Michelle Mathisen)

Everywhere (courtesy of Michelle Mathisen)

Tusk (courtesy of Joe Carson)

Seven Wonders (courtesy of HarlJHogg)

Landslide (courtesy of Michelle Mathisen)

Landslide with full dedication (courtesy of Jen Woodard)

Gypsy (courtesy of Majestic Entertainment)

Gypsy (courtesy of HarlJHogg)

Littles Lies (courtesy of HarlJHogg)

Go Your Own Way (courtesy of Veri Salvador)

World Turning – Drum solo (courtesy of Michelle Mathisen)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KhkTGNCLufA

World Turning / Don’t Stop (courtesy of Stephen Silvagni)

Songbird (courtesy of Ryan Martin)

Photos

(Photo: Eric Dane)
(Photo: Eric Dane)
(Photo: Ken Caillat)
(Photo: Ken Caillat)
(Photo: Ken Caillat)
(Photo: Ken Caillat)

More photos at Getty Images!

Set List

1. The Chain 13. Landslide
2. You Make Loving Fun 14. Never Going Back Again
3. Dreams 15. Over My Head
4. Second Hand News 16. Gypsy
5. Rhiannon 17. Little Lies
6. Everywhere 18. Gold Dust Woman
7. I Know I’m Not Wrong 19. I’m So Afraid
8. Tusk 20. Go Your Own Way
9. Sisters of the Moon 21. World Turning (encore 1)
10. Say You Love Me 22. Don’t Stop
11. Seven Wonders 23. Silver Springs
12. Big Love 24. Songbird (encore 2)
Categories
2014-2015 On With the Show Tour

From the Rolling Stone Vault: Fleetwood Mac

Mega-platinum albums, high school drama, irresponsible living, plus cross-dressing: a quick history of the Mac in RS

A Quick History of the Mac in RS

The True Life Confessions of Fleetwood Mac
RS 235 March 24, 1977

In 1977, Fleetwood Mac’s breakout album, Rumours, was dominating the charts. But the band was in chaos — Christine and John McVie had split up, Mick Fleetwood was divorcing his wife, and Stevie Nicks and Lindsey Buckingham’s relationship was on the rocks. For their first Rolling Stone cover story, they took Cameron Crowe inside that isolation and heartache. “Try being with your secretary at work all day, in a raucous office, and then come home with her at night,” Nicks said.

Winning Big
RS 256 January 12, 1978

When the Mac swept the 1977 Rolling Stone readers’ poll, Fleetwood donned a cheerleader costume for a cover shoot, and the band talked about celebrating its differences. “There’s no continuity in the five people,” said Nicks (right, on tour), “Except the spirit.”

Like a White Winged Dove
RS 351 September 3, 1981

Nicks was enjoying the platinum success of her 1981 solo debut, Bella Donna, which included her duet with Tom Petty, “Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around.” Stevie talked about slowing down — “You get to a certain age where you want to be quieter,” she told RS — but she knew she would be back with the Mac: “[With] Fleetwood Mac, you can never really have any other plans for your life.”

Say You Love Me
RS 643 November 12, 1992

Fleetwood Mac and Rolling Stone were both marking their 25th anniversaries in 1992. To celebrate, John McVie and Fleetwood posed for the magazine’s portrait issue. Says photographer Mark Seliger, “I told Mick, ‘I thought it would be really interesting to have you and John as a wedding portrait.’ And Mick goes silent for a minute and then says, ‘I like the idea. Just one favor: I want to be the bride.'”

Rolling Stone / December 4, 2014

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2014-2015 On With the Show Tour

Stevie: I will never marry again

Stevie Nicks never wants to get married again.

The Fleetwood Mac singer, who was married to Kim Anderson for three months in 1983, says she is happily single at the moment, and while she would consider online dating she doesn’t want to walk down the aisle at any point.

The 66-year-old star – who previously dated her bandmates Lindsey Buckingham and Mick Fleetwood, and the Eagles’ stars Don Henley and Joe Walsh – said: “I’m happy. I might have a relationship, but I’m never getting married again.

“Mick and I always laugh about going on Match.com together and saying, ‘We’re looking for somebody with no health problems. And no bunches of ex-wives and ex-husbands.’ ”

The ‘Dreams’ hitmaker admits she would like to fall in love again but if she doesn’t find another partner she will still have a good life.

She said: “There is always hope. If somebody comes along and he’s worth it, then it will be a lucky throw of the cards. But either way it’s going to be great.”

Stevie has lost 10 pounds in the last few months since the band embarked on a new tour and she credits Lady Gaga’s song ‘Do What U Want’ for inspiring her to dance off the pounds.

She added to PEOPLE magazine: “I go onstage for three hours, four days a week and have lost about 10 pounds in the last couple of months.

“The Lady Gaga song ‘Do What U Want’ makes me want to dance and made me revise the hustle. My girlfriends and I used to do this [dance] at clubs 30 years ago. Now it’s a great way to exercise.”

BANG Media / Friday, December 5, 2014

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2014-2015 On With the Show Tour

Mick Fleetwood on photography, Fleetwood Mac

The Fleetwood Mac lineup that gave the world “Rumours” is headed to Phoenix on Wednesday, Dec. 10, with Christine McVie back on board for her first tour of duty since her 1998 departure. And Mick Fleetwood is as thrilled as anyone to see the soft-rock dream team back together — something no one in that dream team thought would happen.

“But she came back and we are now very complete,” Fleetwood says. “The chemistry is how it should be. It’s truly amazing. I consider it a real pinnacle in this band’s history, and thus the people in it, including me. I’m overjoyed that we’re doing what we’re doing. We are intact.”

Having said that, what he’d really like to talk about is the exhibition of his photographs at DeRubeis Fine Art of Metal in Scottsdale, where Fleetwood is hosting a private reception from 6 to 9 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 9.

The drummer credits his father with having piqued his interest in photography.

“We traveled a lot because that was my childhood,” Fleetwood says, “so I’ve got muscle memory of someone who enjoyed documenting things that were gonna be here and then gone, maybe forever, unless captured. We didn’t really have, as a family, any money, but looking back on it, Dad always had a nice camera. So he took the time to do it.”

Fleetwood started taking photographs while on the road with Fleetwood Mac, if purely as what he would call a snap shooter.

“I would always be the one accused in the band of being a nuisance,” he says, “taking pictures of everything.”

And John McVie has no one but himself to blame for that. The bassist bought a camera first, when the British rockers started “doing well in the late ’60s,” Fleetwood says, “or what we thought was doing well.” And at that point, “it was like, ‘If he’s got one of those, I’m getting one of those.’ ”

So he bought a decent camera, like his father had before him, and started taking pictures on the road, “just documenting my life and being annoying.”

Much later, he says, he started to focus on still life and nature photography, following the instincts that had served him well in music.

“I started thinking, ‘Well, what’s gonna turn me on?’ ” he says. “Which is, in truth, how I approach my music, to be driven by a form of passion, a form of romance, versus coming at it hugely technically.”

Fleetwood first allowed his photographs to be exhibited about 10 years ago.

“A friend of mine in Maui said, ‘You ought to show these,’ ” he recalls. “And like a lot of people who do things for fun, they go, ‘Well, no one’s gonna want to see those.’ Now, when I hear people say that, I go, ‘No, no, no. You ought to do it. It’ll be fun. The worst that’s gonna happen is someone will say it’s a bunch of crap.’ ”

Photography isn’t the only extra-musical creative outlet he has put out there to be judged. In late October, he published a memoir, “Play On: Now, Then and Fleetwood Mac: The Autobiography,” co-written with Anthony Bozza.

“Some of it was sobering and painful,” Fleetwood says. “But once you get over a certain dialogue with yourself, which usually happens, quite frankly, when you get a little older, it’s all fair game. I think the lesson to be learned is not to be sitting there full of remorse and shame and all those awful words that don’t serve any purpose ultimately. What they should be is words like objective, reflective, taking responsibility, trying to be more honest with yourself.”

While working on the book with Bozza, Fleetwood started sifting through the archives he has accumulated.

“We got into thousands of pictures that still need sorting out,” he recalls. “And I showed him some footage that I had commissioned during the ‘Rumours’ tour. We were in the Far East right in the middle of all that touring behind the ‘Rumours’ album. So it was in the day, in what really changed this band’s history and the people in it forever.”

There were ground rules, Fleetwood says. “Not to be all the blood and guts of Fleetwood Mac and all the drug stories and all that. It’s in there because it’s known anyhow and it just would look very odd if it’s not in there. But what I tried to do was to put it in perspective. And where there is sensationalist stuff, I tried to have a sense of humor in an English way and speak to it mainly from my own perspective.”

In the end, the book is more about Fleetwood’s personal journey.

“If it stopped tomorrow, you could never separate Mick Fleetwood and Fleetwood Mac,” he says. “It would be impossible. Which is neither bad nor good. It’s just a fact. There are several people that have come and gone in Fleetwood Mac — and come back to it — that can say, ‘Hey, I spent 10, 12 years on my private furlough away from Fleetwood Mac.’ I can’t. And I didn’t.

“The point I’m making is it’s forever just a fact that my adult life has really been completely dedicated to being in this band.”

Fleetwood Mac

Details: 8 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 10. US Airways Center, Second and Jefferson streets, Phoenix. $59.50-$192. 800-745-3000, ticketmaster.com.

‘Reflections: The Mick Fleetwood Collection’ private reception

Details: 6-9 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 9. DeRubeis Fine Art of Metal, 7171 E. Main St., Scottsdale. Purchase of Mick Fleetwood artwork required. 480-941-6033, roadshowcompany.com

Reach the reporter at ed.masley@arizonarepublic.com or 602-444-4495. Twitter.com/EdMasley

Ed Masley | Arizona Republic / Friday, December 5, 2014

Categories
2014-2015 On With the Show Tour Concert Reviews

REVIEW: Fleetwood Mac leads a loaded reunion at Oracle Arena

Stevie Nicks is going for it. She’s been dressed in all black all night — a confusing, drapey, sequined and, yes, Stevie Nicks-esque shawl over a dress, whose shimmering tendrils she seems to be handling like rosary beads — but for “Gold Dust Woman” she’s brought out a sheer gold shawl, and she is putting it to work. With her back to the crowd at Oracle Arena, she spreads her arms out wide before bringing both hands to her blonde head for something that looks like the marriage of headbanging and the gesture one performs when experiencing a migraine; the midway point between rocking the fuck out and being in severe pain.

Fleetwood Mac live in Oakland (Photo: Noah Graham)
Fleetwood Mac live in Oakland (Photo: Noah Graham)

Which is, really, the main thrust of the mood at a Fleetwood Mac show — at least, at the first Fleetwood Mac show in a decade in a half that includes the original ’70s lineup: Christine McVie, notably fresh-faced behind the keyboard after 16 years away; Lindsey Buckingham, whose virtuoso fingerpicking on the electric guitar is rendered nearly unfair when combined with the fact that he apparently doesn’t age at all; John McVie, perhaps the only member of Fleetwood Mac who could reasonably be described as understated, despite providing the crucial bass heartbeat to so many hit songs; Nicks, whose stage presence alone makes Lady Gaga seem like John Kerry; and drummer Mick Fleetwood himself, who — dressed in short pants and red sneakers, wispy sideburn hair a-flying, taking indulgent solos — was quite possibly having more fun than anyone in the room, letting out animalistic yelps between taps of the hi-hat and punctuating his between-song banter with a gesture recognizable as the universal sign for “I am on Splash Mountain and we have just started going downhill.”

Fleetwood Mac live in Oakland (Photo: Noah Graham)
Fleetwood Mac live in Oakland (Photo: Noah Graham)

In short, emotions ran high last night. From Nicks dedicating “Landslide” to her first real boyfriend at Atherton High School, to Fleetwood’s assertion that things get crazy when you let the drummer up front (his headset mic failed to work at some point, and briefly holding court at the tip of the stage seemed to make many people very happy), the whole thing felt loaded. This is, of course, difficult to separate from the soap opera that is Fleetwood Mac’s history, the romantic entanglements and illicit affairs and buckets upon buckets of cocaine that somehow went up people’s noses and came back out transformed into songs as sunny as “Don’t Stop Thinking About Tomorrow.” There’s a theatrically implied underbelly to nearly everything they do, and no matter how much you’ve painted Stevie Nicks into some kind of fantasy-mom corner — and no matter what percentage of the 19,000 people around you appear to be squeaky-clean retirees with varying degrees of former hippiedom in their pasts, all cutting loose with widely varying degrees of rhythm — there’s the ever-present knowledge that yeah, she partied way, way harder than you ever will, and the same probably goes for a lot of these old-school fans. Lived to tell the tale, too.

Which is why you indulge Nicks when she starts telling the same story, verbatim, that she apparently told last week in L.A.: About being a poor student at San Jose State University (crowd: “woooooo!”) and driving up to San Francisco to shop at the Velvet Underground, which was the coolest and most expensive rock star store in the world, as evidenced by having Janis Joplin and Grace Slick as customers. About how she couldn’t afford anything, but she stood there in that store and she knew she’d be able to someday. Cue a curtsy, plus exaggerated fondling of her sequined outfit. Cue “Gypsy,” with the opening lines “So I’m back, to the Velvet Underground…”

Fleetwood Mac live in Oakland (Photo: Noah Graham)
Fleetwood Mac live in Oakland (Photo: Noah Graham)

Can you blame her if it’s cheesy? You can’t. Especially when Christine McVie, her alto and perfect hair seemingly untouched by the ravages of time, launches into “Say You Love Me,” or sits down at the piano for “Little Lies” and you realize that half the Fleetwood Mac songs you hear so often they’ve become background music (in the best possible way) are driven by that almost unnervingly sweet, easy voice. This requires ignoring the weird background visuals — gold dust for “Gold Dust Woman,” strange, unnecessary combinations of water droplets and psychedelic swirls of color for nearly everything else. It also requires removing yourself from the reality of, say, things that actually happened earlier in the day, back in 2014, like the grand jury’s decision in the horrifying police brutality murder case of Eric Garner. It requires shutting off your brain for long enough to live inside a year when Ronald Reagan was a great hope for a great many people.

Noah Graham for Oracle Arena This will, you see, help with getting into the proper headspace for receiving Nicks’ lines about how Christine McVie came back to the band in January of 2014 — less than two years after Nicks told Rolling Stone that was about as likely as “an asteroid hitting the earth” -— because “when you put something out into the universe, it comes true, and you Fleetwood Mac fans all woke up one day and wanted that. You have magic powers. If you want something bad enough, dreams come true.”

If nothing else, it requires believing that Fleetwood Mac believes those things. And last night, there were absolutely zero doubts to be had about that.

Fleetwood Mac live in Oakland (Photo: Noah Graham)
Fleetwood Mac live in Oakland (Photo: Noah Graham)

Emma Silvers / SF Weekly / Thursday, December 4, 2014

Categories
2014-2015 On With the Show Tour

More US dates added

USA! 2015 dates for the Fleetwood Mac ‘On With Show’ tour have been announced and are ON SALE NOW:

Mar 03 • Houston, TX • Toyota Center
Mar 04 • Dallas, TX • American Airlines Center
Mar 21 • Miami, FL • American Airlines Arena
Mar 23 • Orlando, FL • Amway Center
Mar 25 • Atlanta, GA • Philips Arena
Apr 01 • Denver, CO • Pepsi Center
Apr 04 • Vancouver, BC • Pepsi Live at Rogers Arena
Apr 06 • Bakersfield, CA • Rabobank Arena
Apr 07 • Oakland, CA • Oracle Arena
Apr 10 • Los Angeles, CA • The Forum
Apr 11 • Las Vegas, NV • MGM Grand Garden Arena

FULL TOUR DATES AND TICKET LINKS: http://www.mickfleetwood.com/tour

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2014-2015 On With the Show Tour

VIDEOS 12/3: Oracle Arena, Oakland

Fleetwood Mac returned to the Bay Area on Wednesday, performing at the Oracle Arena in Oakland, their 31st show of the tour.

Stevie Nicks dedicated “Landslide” to her “first real boyfriend,” David Young, whom she dated while attending Menlo-Atherton High School during the late 1960s. Stevie has often dedicated “Landslide” to Young when she is performing in the Bay Area.

COMPLETE OAKLAND COVERAGE: Photos | Reviews | Set List | Videos

Videos

Special thanks to Michael Carr, coldengrey12, cymalc, Ellen H, Barry Gustin, LaBoggs, Jeff Nelson, Marc Santos, sgwarner, and Shell4017 for sharing these videos!

COMPILATION (courtesy of Michael Carr)

The Chain (courtesy of Jeff Nelson)

You Make Loving Fun (courtesy of sgwarner)

Dreams (courtesy of LaBoggs)

Rhiannon (courtesy of LaBoggs)

Everywhere (courtesy of Barry Gustin)

Say You Love Me (courtesy of Barry Gustin)

Seven Wonders (courtesy of Shell4017)

Landslide with dedication (courtesy of coldengrey12)

Over My Head (courtesy of LaBoggs)

Gypsy introduction (courtesy of LaBoggs)

Gypsy (courtesy of Ellen H)

Gold Dust Woman (courtesy of Barry Gustin)

Go Your Own Way – short clip (courtesy of LaBoggs)

World Turning (courtesy of LaBoggs)

Don’t Stop (courtesy of Marc Santos)

Mick’s closing thoughts (courtesy of cymalc)


[slideshow_deploy id=’30684′]

Reviews

Fleetwood Mac leads loaded reunion at Oracle Arena (SF Weekly)

Set List

1. The Chain 13. Landslide
2. You Make Loving Fun 14. Never Going Back Again
3. Dreams 15. Over My Head
4. Second Hand News 16. Gypsy
5. Rhiannon 17. Little Lies
6. Everywhere 18. Gold Dust Woman
7. I Know I’m Not Wrong 19. I’m So Afraid
8. Tusk 20. Go Your Own Way
9. Sisters of the Moon 21. World Turning (encore 1)
10. Say You Love Me 22. Don’t Stop
11. Seven Wonders 23. Silver Springs
12. Big Love 24. Songbird (encore 2)
Categories
2014-2015 On With the Show Tour Concert Reviews

REVIEW: Fleetwood Mac concert reunion a triumph

With Christine McVie back in the fold after a 16-year hiatus, Fleetwood Mac begins a welcome new chapter by looking back to its heyday.

If Mick Fleetwood’s shout-out to his own band in San Diego Tuesday night simply (and loudly) stated the obvious, well, he’s surely earned the right to crow a bit.

“The Mac is definitely back!” the towering, 6-foot-5-inch drummer proudly declared. The sold-out audience of nearly 10,000 fans at SDSU’s Viejas Arena cheered loudly in return, just as it had through nearly all of the 2½-hour-plus show.

Fleetwood Mac in San Diego (Photo: John Gastaldo)

For the record, apart from a hiatus of a few years in the 1990s, this legendary rock act has never been away. Fleetwood is the only member to have performed in each of the band’s many lineups since its inception in 1967, including the one that performed here last year at Viejas Arena.

But Tuesday’s concert was especially memorable because it found this veteran ensemble taking a major step forward by taking a major step back. After a 16-year hiatus — a period of time far longer than the entire careers of many rock bands — singer, keyboardist and songwriter Christine McVie this year rejoined Fleetwood Mac for her first tour with the group since 1999.

Fleetwood Mac in San Diego (Photo: John Gastaldo)

Her welcome return is both exhilarating and liberating. This holds true both for the band and its multigenerational fans, many of whom remained standing and often sang along for much of Tuesday’s show.

Or, as Fleetwood put it after “World Turning,” the first of four encore selections: “Having this wonderful lady share the stage, making us complete, our songbird has returned.”

Fleetwood Mac in San Diego (Photo: John Gastaldo)

At 71, McVie is the oldest member of Fleetwood Mac, which was a three-year-old English blues-rock band when she came on board in 1970. Her return has bolstered the group in several key ways.

Down to earth and free of even a hint of affectation, she provides a welcome counterbalance to singer Stevie Nicks and singer-guitarist Lindsey Buckingham. The two American musicians joined Fleetwood Mac in 1975 and helped propel it to international pop-rock superstardom with the classic 1977 album, “Rumours.”

Fleetwood Mac in San Diego (Photo: John Gastaldo)

McVie sang lead on nearly a third of the 24 songs performed Tuesday, nearly all of which had been deferentially shelved by the band when she retired in 1999. It was a treat to hear her rustic, fuss-free lead vocals on “You Make Loving Fun,” “Little Lies,” “Say You Love Me” and the concert-concluding “Songbird.”

It was equally enjoyable hearing her harmonize again with Nicks and Buckingham, who clearly relished having their longtime collaborator back in the fold. So did drummer Fleetwood, 67, and bassist John McVie, 69, Christine’s former husband, who sounded and appeared none the worse after starting treatment last fall for cancer. (The band was tastefully augmented by three female backing singers and two male auxiliary musicians, who also supplied periodic vocal support.)

Fleetwood Mac in San Diego (Photo: John Gastaldo)

Christine McVie’s return also means Nicks and Buckingham no longer each have to handle 50 percent of the lead vocals. As a result, both were able to tackle such classics as “Dreams,” “Rhiannon,” “Second Hand News” and “Tusk” with renewed energy and enthusiasm. They also beamed broadly as they harmonized with McVie on “Don’t Stop,” “Go Your Own Way” and other decades-old gems that still sound fresh and vital.

Buckingham delivered a number of inspired guitar solos that showcased his finger-picking prowess. His rippling lines on “I Know I’m Not Wrong,” “Big Love” and the Wishbone Ash-inspired “I’m So Afraid” were highlights. Ditto Nicks’ deeply moving singing on “Landslide,” and “Gold Dust Woman,” which turned into a rare (at least for the current iteration of Fleetwood Mac) extended jam.

Fleetwood Mac in San Diego (Photo: John Gastaldo)

Fleetwood and John McVie provided a rock-solid foundation throughout. Their tirelessly robust playing in no way indicated the two, both of whom are longtime U.S. residents, qualified for Social Security several years ago.

Alas, the pacing of the concert sagged in places, including a rousing, but overly extended, Buckingham solo segment that seemed designed to give his band mates an extended offstage break. Fleetwood’s 5-minute drum solo on “World Turning,” while an undeniable crowd-pleaser, overstayed its welcome. Conversely, Nicks’ introduction to “Gypsy” was as long as some of the songs performed, but she reminisced about her years as a young aspiring musician with more than enough infectious verve to compensate.

And when everything clicked, which was often, time almost stood still — even as Buckingham, 65, boyishly bounded across the stage and Nicks, 66, did her witchy woman twirls. Don’t stop, indeed.

Fleetwood Mac in San Diego (Photo: John Gastaldo)
George Varga / UT San Diego / Wednesday, December 3, 2014

Categories
2014-2015 On With the Show Tour

Five new shows added in UK, Ireland

Five new shows have just been added to the Fleetwood Mac 2015 ‘On With The Show’ Tour in the UK and Ireland. Tickets go on sale for the UK dates starting Thursday, December 4th at 9am local time and Ireland dates on Monday, December 8th at at 9am local time.

Tue, Jun 27 – 02 Arena – London, UK (Night 4)
Sat, Jul 4 – Genting Arena – Birmingham, UK (Night 3)
Sun, Jul 5 – First Direct Arena – Leeds, UK (Night 2)
Wed, Jul 8 – SSE Hydro – Glasgow, UK (Night 3)
Fri, Jul 10 – 3Arena – Dublin, Ireland (Night 2)

Visit the Tour Section for a full list of ‘On With The Show’ Tour dates.

Categories
2014-2015 On With the Show Tour

VIDEOS 12/2: Viejas Arena, San Diego

Fleetwood Mac performed at the college campus of San Diego State University on Tuesday night, rocking fans, teachers, and students alike at Viejas Arena, the band’s 30th show of the tour. Due to bad weather, which delayed concert goers from getting to the show on time, the band pushed back the start of the show by 30 minutes and skipped final speeches.

Stevie dedicated “Landslide” to her friend Holly. “Tonight, I’d like to dedicate it to our really good friend Holly and to her husband Dave, and to all of the doctors that were involved in a very difficult situation and have done such an amazing job. So this is for you, Holly, ‘Landslide.'”

COMPLETE SAN DIEGO COVERAGE: Photos | ReviewsSet List | Videos

Photos

[slideshow_deploy id=’30420′]

More photos at Getty Images!

Videos

Special thanks to Randy Bragdon, Alexis Capitano, Glenn Forrester, Mark Drakk, Christian H, llcoolcomb, Majestic Entertainment, Millerviller, musicsdca, Piano in a Living Room, and Rhiannon Grace for sharing these videos!

COMPILATION: Tusk / Sisters of the Moon / Over My Head / Songbird (courtesy of muscsdca)

COMPILATION: Gold Dust Woman / Say You Love Me (courtesy of musicsdca)

The Chain (courtesy of Alexis Capitano)

You Make Loving Fun (courtesy of Glenn Forrester)

Dreams (courtesy of Glenn Forrester)

Rhiannon (courtesy of Rhiannon Grace)

Everywhere (courtesy of Glenn Forrester)

Tusk – short clip (courtesy of llcoolcomb)

Sisters of the Moon (courtesy of Alexis Capitano)

Seven Wonders (courtesy of Alexis Capitano)

Seven Wonders (courtesy of Glenn Forrester)

Big Love (courtesy of Mark Drakk)

Landslide with dedication (courtesy of Millerviller)

Landslide (courtesy of Randy Bragdon)

Never Going Back Again (courtesy of Millerviller)

Over My Head (courtesy of Mark Drakk)

Gypsy introduction (courtesy llcoolcomb)

Gypsy (courtesy of Alexis Capitano)

Gold Dust Woman (courtesy of Millerviller)

I’m So Afraid (courtesy of (Piano in a Living Room)

I’m So Afraid (courtesy of Millerviller)

Go Your Own Way (courtesy of Majestic Entertainment)

Go Your Own Way (courtesy of Millerviller)

World Turning (courtesy of Millerviller)

Don’t Stop (courtesy of Christian H)

Songbird (courtesy of Majestic Entertainment)

Reviews

Set List

1. The Chain 13. Landslide
2. You Make Loving Fun 14. Never Going Back Again
3. Dreams 15. Over My Head
4. Second Hand News 16. Gypsy
5. Rhiannon 17. Little Lies
6. Everywhere 18. Gold Dust Woman
7. I Know I’m Not Wrong 19. I’m So Afraid
8. Tusk 20. Go Your Own Way
9. Sisters of the Moon 21. World Turning (encore 1)
10. Say You Love Me 22. Don’t Stop
11. Seven Wonders 23. Silver Springs
12. Big Love 24. Songbird (encore 2)
Categories
2014-2015 On With the Show Tour Concert Reviews

REVIEW: Fleetwood Mac live at The Forum, Los Angeles

“That’s not Stevie Nicks,” asserted the woman sitting next to me at the first night of Fleetwood Mac‘s 2-night stay at The Forum in Los Angeles. “I’ve been to hundreds of her shows and that is not her. She does not move like that.”

Not that I would know: this was my first time seeing the band—now in the glory of their classic lineup—and had little more than music videos and her time on American Horror Story: Coven from which to judge. When I looked up at the wispy-but-imposing blonde woman six rows ahead of me, and then compared it to the screen-sized version hung up above, I felt confident that this was the gypsy herself. I posited as such to the woman to my right. She paused before pointing, “look at her ankles!”

(Photo: Alicia Lutes)
(Photo: Alicia Lutes)

Maybe Stevie Nicks was moving differently that night—but she’d have good reason to be. The band’s most famous

lineup was back in action, including the long-gone Christine McVie, who very well may have stolen the show from her compatriots that night. Her return after a 16-year absence from the group had clearly shot a bolt of electricity up Fleetwood Mac’s collective spine.

And it was evident from minute one. The 2.5 hour show (with no opener) began with “The Chain,” the only song off of 1977’s Rumours that was written by all five members. The energy— from the stage to the very large room surrounding it was one of celebration and fulfillment. Finally, they were right where they belonged.

McVie took over for the second song of the night, “You Make Loving Fun,” during which she beamed the whole time. Lindsey Buckingham, Mick Fleetwood, John McVie, and Nicks were all vibrating on that frequency of celebration, loving every minute they were praising McVie’s grounding presence.

(Photo: Alicia Lutes)
(Photo: Alicia Lutes)

This early momentum made this particular concert-goer a bit nervous. The first half of the show was s0 packed with hits—from “Rhiannon” to “Dreams” to “Second Hand News” to “I Know I’m Not Wrong”—that we were, personally, a bit afraid it would all hit a wall.

But oh no, how that gypsy shines when the stars are aligned. When people talk of star and staying power, of a seemingly otherworldly talent and ability to create things that emotionally resonate with people, all they need do is point to Fleetwood Mac as Stevie Nicks spins and spins and spins her way into the mystic magic she’s creating with her voice. There is truly nothing like her, how she demands your eye with her tambourine playing, how hair swirls around her twirling frame, how she conveys emotional honesty within a single note. It’s something special that cannot be diminished by age or time—it just is, and will continue to be, until there is no more sound to be heard.

Other highlights included “Tusk,” complete with a video accompaniment of the USC Marching Band performing the very song while McVie broke out the accordion and Buckingham strutted his way across the stage, and “Lies” for its sheer energy and exuberance.

And, of course, we’d be remiss to not mention “Landslide,” with nothing more than Buckingham on guitar and Nicks on vocals. After all the years between them, and all the words already said about this song, its origins, its relationship to the band that performs it, there’s little more to note that hasn’t already been said. To feel it in that moment, even after the hundreds of thousands of times we’ve all heard it before, it still somehow felt raw, damaged, and poignant. The magic a song like “Landslide” possesses will never really go away—only evolve and get better with age.

It’s like Buckingham noted before his acoustic take on “Big Love,” when he explained, prior to performing it, how much the song’s meaning has changed for him as the years have accumulated. It’s still the same song, sonically and lyrically, but its frame of reference had changed. The way he moves throughout the song’s meaning has shifted, like a dancer acclimating to the new limits and abilities of an aging body. Yet it looked natural next to Stevie and her new dance moves

In that way, the woman next to me was right: this wasn’t Stevie Nicks, not like before. This was something new but still familiar, and it moves to a whole different beat.

(Photo: Alicia Lutes)
(Photo: Alicia Lutes)

Here’s the full setlist:

The Chain
You Make Loving Fun
Dreams
Second Hand News
Rhiannon
Everywhere
I Know I’m Not Wrong
Tusk
Sisters of the Moon
Say You Love Me
Seven Wonders
Big Love
Landslide
Never Going Back Again
Over My Head
Gypsy
Little Lies
Gold Dust Woman
I’m So Afraid
Go Your Own Way

Encore:
World Turning
Don’t Stop
Silver Springs

Encore 2:
Songbird

Alicia Lutes / Nerdist / Tuesday, December 2, 2014

Categories
2014-2015 On With the Show Tour

Why Fleetwood Mac’s Tusk is better than Rumours

Fleetwood Mac Tusk (1979)The first two albums Fleetwood Mac released after Stevie Nicks and Lindsey Buckingham joined Christine McVie, bassist John McVie, and drummer Mick Fleetwood provided the pop soundtrack of the late 1970s. The tender nature of singles like “Landslide,” the mysticism of “Rhiannon,” and the bold confessional nature of “Go Your Own Way” and “The Chain” struck a chord with anyone with a radio and a pair of working ears. Rumours would go on to be one of the top ten selling albums of all time. It continues to resonate today as much as it did when it was first released in 1977, influencing musicians for generations to come, providing the soundtrack for ’90s presidential campaigns, and continuing to set itself upon the lofty perch of various “all-time best album” lists.

How did the quintet follow up such unprecedented success? By releasing Tusk, a double-album that in 1979 was one of the most expensive albums ever made. Tusk’s 20 experimental tracks felt like the disjointed work of three charismatic solo artists as opposed to five talented musicians. Despite the fact it sold two million copies in the United States, it was considered a costly failure, especially sitting in the long shadow cast by Rumours. Unless they’re Michael Jackson, how could any artist expect to come close to repeating the feeling and enormous popularity of an album that feels like lightning captured in a bottle?

Buckingham knew it couldn’t be done. It’s obvious in his studio work on the album (he took on most of the production duties for Tusk, and nine of the songwriting credits on the album are his) that it was time to move on and take a more contemporary and experimental approach to the music. This explains why 25 years later, history has been kind to the disc. It was an album that was not only a product of its time, with the album’s influences coming less from the soft rock era the band was leaving behind and more from the punk and new wave sounds that were emerging, but was also ahead of its time. Songs like “Think About Me” feel like they could come out of the indie rock music of today, chock full of rich layers that need to be peeled back with each listen to be fully appreciated. You can hear that influence — a desire to keep a song elegant in its simplicity — in songs like “Ask Me Anything” from The Strokes’ album First Impressions of Earth.

There are a lot of details that can be picked up on multiple listens of Tusk, which makes the album a far richer experience than the slick production on Rumours. On the strange, percussion-heavy, tribal title track (which supposedly refers to the euphemism Fleetwood has for his member), you can hear Buckingham give some studio direction, and then the drummer says “real savage like” as the USC Trojan Marching Band trumpets in. The one-off line isn’t repeated during any other live recordings of the song. “Here comes the night time looking for a little more/Waiting on the right time somebody outside the door,” a line on the raw and angry track “Not the Funny,” makes another appearance six spots down during “I Know I’m Not Wrong.” Then there’s Christine McVie’s quiet sultry repeat of the final line of “Never Forget,” the album’s lovely optimistic finale. It’s the perfect finish to an album that put everyone in the band through the emotional wringer.

It was the drama behind each of the songs that made Rumours so relatable to so many listeners. That album is infamous for chronicling the declining relationships and persistent addictions that took place, but on Tusk the music is much more heartbreaking, confessional, and personal. “What Makes You Think You’re the One,” just one of the many songs Buckingham wrote about Nicks, possibly addresses his former love’s cocaine habit by asking her if she is the one “who can live without dying.” Christine McVie sings to a lover (possibly McVie), who is cheating on her to “go and do what you want” as she waits for him to return on “Never Make Me Cry.” Last September, Nicks confirmed to Billboard that the urban rock legend about the song “Sara” was partially true: the song came from the name of the unborn child Nicks conceived with Eagles’ singer Don Henley while the couple were dating. As Nicks recalls:

“Had I married Don and had that baby, and had she been a girl, I would have named her Sara. But there was another woman in my life named Sara, who shortly after that became Mick’s wife, Sara Fleetwood.”

The most sonically thrilling aspect of the expansive Tusk is the harmonies of singers, thanks to Buckingham’s continued fascination with California bands like The Beach Boys. The background vocals on “Walk a Thin Line” mesh so well with the guitar virtuoso’s falsetto during the song’s chorus that you want to make that journey across the tightrope right along with him. The harmonies also shine on the heartbreaking “That’s All For Everyone,” as Buckingham “cries out for more” while trying to decide whether the band should continue on together considering all the personal turmoil their collaboration has wrought.

It was after this album that Buckingham, Fleetwood, and Nicks pursued solo albums. Buckingham went on to explore the experiments he started on Tusk with the album Law and Order. Nicks would grow into the role of the mythical diva she is today. The band as a whole went back to the formula they honed on Rumours with 1982’s Mirage, having spent their creative capital on an album that many see as an oddity, but holds up as a masterwork today.

Fleetwood Mac is scheduled to play US Airways Center on Wednesday, December 10.

Jason Keil / Phoenix New Times / Tuesday, December 2, 2014

Categories
2014-2015 On With the Show Tour Concert Reviews

REVIEW: A band reunited, team spirit intact

Fleetwood Mac played the Forum on Saturday night with Christine McVie, back after a long break.

(Photo: Michael Robinson Chavez)
(Photo: Michael Robinson Chavez)

Fleetwood Mac is having a moment.

Decades after its late-1970s commercial peak, the band can still fill arenas around the world with fans eager to relive memories indelibly linked to old hits like “Dreams” and “Go Your Own Way.”

Yet Fleetwood Mac’s polished pop-rock has also become a touchstone for younger, hipper acts such as Jenny Lewis and One Direction. In 2011, the television show “Glee” built an episode around the group’s music; the next year it was the subject of a high-profile tribute album.

So it’s not hard to understand Christine McVie’s decision, announced in January, to rejoin the band after retiring in 1998.

She helped create the legend — shouldn’t she enjoy the glory?

(Photo: Michael Robinson Chavez)
(Photo: Michael Robinson Chavez)

Fleetwood Mac’s tour with McVie, whose presence restores the lineup that made the gazillion-selling “Rumours,” stopped at the Forum for two concerts over the weekend. (It will return for a third on Dec. 6.)

But if the cheers that greeted McVie on Saturday confirmed her reasoning, the singer’s participation also reminded you that, despite its huge success, this is a deeply weird rock group, with three songwriters – McVie, Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks – whose approaches hardly seem compatible.

Backed by the stalwart rhythm section of drummer Mick Fleetwood and bassist John McVie (to whom she was married until 1977), Christine McVie was warm and trusting in “You Make Loving Fun” and the buoyant “Everywhere.” The cheerful optimism – and the propulsive groove – of “Don’t Stop” inspired thousands in the audience to sing along.

(Photo: Michael Robinson Chavez)
(Photo: Michael Robinson Chavez)

And though “Little Lies” hinted at the romantic deception that famously runs through Fleetwood Mac’s history, the tune’s sweet melody neutralized any sense of real desperation.

Buckingham offered no such protection as he growled the lyrics of “Big Love,” about the cold comfort of material fortune, over harsh finger-picked guitar. He was similarly intense in the stomping “Tusk” and a long, raw rendition of the bluesy “I’m So Afraid.”

“Second Hand News” was catchier but still anxious, its crisp tempo a promise of escape from the turmoil the song describes.

Then there was Nicks, who set aside her bandmates’ realism in favor of imagery rooted in history and mythology: “Rhiannon,” “Sisters of the Moon,” “Seven Wonders,” the last of which, she told the audience, had made it back into Fleetwood Mac’s set list after the song appeared in a recent episode of “American Horror Story.”

That quasi-mystical vibe is a big part of what’s endeared Nicks in particular to a new generation of musicians, including the sisters of L.A.’s Haim, to whom she dedicated “Landslide” on Saturday. (The Haim sisters weren’t the only admirers who turned up to pay their respects: According to a tweet from the Forum, Harry Styles of One Direction took in Friday’s show.)

Twirling in one of her trademark shawls during “Gypsy,” Nicks drew a wildly enthusiastic response from the crowd. And fans seemed untroubled by the adjustments she made to the melody of “Dreams,” a song whose high notes are now presumably out of her reach.

Yet that adulation hasn’t led, as it does with so many stars, to an unquenchable need for more.

Here Nicks appeared happy — even relieved, perhaps — to share the spotlight she grew accustomed to filling while McVie was away, and it was that sense of camaraderie that held Fleetwood Mac’s internal contradictions together.

“Once you come back, you can’t leave again,” Nicks recalled telling McVie in a rambling monologue about the reunion. That she meant it was clear when McVie, singing her ballad “Songbird,” closed the show.

Twitter: @mikaelwood / Copyright © 2014, Los Angeles Times

Mikael Wood / Los Angeles Times / Sunday, November 30, 2014

Categories
2014-2015 On With the Show Tour

Fleetwood Mac to headline Isle of Wight Festival

Fleetwood Mac are to appear as headliners at next year’s Isle of Wight Festival.

The veteran rockers, who have lined up a series of tour dates for the coming months, will play the event on June 14, marking their only festival performance.

The group said: “We’ve always wanted to come to the UK to play the Isle of Wight Festival, and so we are delighted that in 2015, we are finally making it happen.

“So many of our fellow artists and friends have played at this historic event over the years, and we can’t wait to see all of our fans on the island next summer.”

It is thought to be the first time they have headlined a major UK festival with the line-up which took them to worldwide fame with hit albums such as Rumours.

The performance will feature Lindsey Buckingham, Stevie Nicks, Mick Fleetwood and John McVie, along with Christine McVie who initially rejoined the band for a guest slot last year.

Festival organiser John Giddings said: “It’s no secret that Fleetwood Mac have been on my wishlist for the Isle of Wight Festival for some time now, so I’m very pleased and extremely proud to have them headline next year’s event. With Christine now back in the band too, it is going to be a momentous occasion, a moment in music history.”

Tickets go on sale on Friday at 9am at isleofwightfestival.com.

Press Association-Independent (UK) / Monday, December 1, 2014

(Graphic courtesy of Mick Fleetwood's official Facebook page)
(Graphic courtesy of Mick Fleetwood’s official Facebook page)
Categories
2014-2015 On With the Show Tour Concert Reviews

REVIEW: Fleetwood Mac returns to the Forum intact

In a recent interview with Mojo magazine, Fleetwood Mac drummer and co-namesake Mick Fleetwood admitted the band had been a bit “one-legged” in the 16 years it carried on without keyboardist/vocalist Christine McVie. If that was the case, Fleetwood Mac was back on two legs, standing tall at the Forum on Black Friday for what was — according to a photo montage from its ’70s heyday proudly displayed in the Forum Club — its 13th appearance at the now remodeled venue.

Given that this was the group’s first date back in L.A. with Christine McVie and its history with the building, Friday’s show had all the trappings of a special event and Fleetwood Mac didn’t disappoint.

Opening with “The Chain,” the only song on the band’s 1977 blockbuster Rumours written by all five members, Fleetwood Mac at first celebrated its unity before turning the spotlight on the returning McVie, who sang lead on the even bigger Rumours era hit, “You Make Loving Fun.”

With all due respect to Fleetwood, we’d argue that Fleetwood Mac was more like a three-legged dog without Christine McVie, with frontwoman Stevie Nicks and frontman and guitarist Lindsey Buckingham holding up the front end while Fleetwood and fellow original member, bassist John McVie, together, supporting part of back. At the Forum, it was clear just how crucial Christine McVie’s role is, not only providing keyboards (although the band was supplemented by an additional keyboardist/guitarist and guitarist) and backing vocals for Nicks and Buckingham (the band was also assisted by three female backing vocalists), but providing an earthy lead vocal presence to counter Nicks’ sometimes out-three gypsy visions and Buckingham’s hyper emotionalism. And, it was that variety that made Friday’s show such a joy.

Christine McVie’s initial run in the spotlight was followed by Nicks’ turn on “Dreams,” then Buckingham on “Second Hand News,” back to Nicks with “Rhiannon,” extended with the singer altering her phrasing from the recorded version, proving this was no mere carbon copy of the record. The Tusk album track “I Know I’m Not Wrong” was a brief interlude from the hit parade before the title track, complete with video of the USC Marching Band performing the song on the video screen, for which Christine McVie added accordion and Buckingham replicated the elephant walk with guitar in tow.

The first third of the show was stacked so heavily with classic hits, it made you wonder if the band could sustain the momentum for the remainder of the gig, but that proved not to be a problem, as it used different configurations and vocalists to keep it interesting.

And the hits kept coming, as well, including McVie’s “Say That You Love Me,” the band’s first-ever top 40 hit after the veteran British blues band was revitalized with the addition of Nicks and Buckingham. After Nicks sang “Seven Wonders,” she gave a shout out to American Horror Story, which last season featured her in a cameo and the song, prompting the band to add it to the set.

Emotional highlights were natural to Buckingham and Nicks sharing the stage, Buckingham offering a startling acoustic reading of “Big Love,” after noting how the song’s meaning has changed over the years and then Nicks dedicating the ballad “Landslide” to “her fairy goddaughters” before the Forum’s roof sparkled as she sang.

Nicks also took the spotlight in “Gypsy” and “Gold Dust Woman.” The former was proceeded by a story about her early years in the Bay Area and remaining true to your dreams, while the latter had her donning a gold shawl and offering a freeform dance as she teetered on her high heels while the band provided a psychedelic interlude.

Towards the end of the set, the monster hit “Go Your Own Way” came off as a celebratory jam, with Nicks and Buckingham facing the drum kit and Fleetwood responding with a devilish grin.
During the encore, “World Turning” was punctuated with the hoariest of all arena-rock clichés — the drum solo. Yet Fleetwood made it tolerable by turning it into a call-and-response exercise with the audience, spouting gibberish and sporting wacky facial expressions between mercilessly pounding his kit.

“Don’t Stop” had all three main voices joining in unison and also seemed to be a theme for the two-and-half hour show and this 2014 tour. After Nicks took it down with “Silver Springs” and Buckingham (on piano) accompanied McVie on “Songbird,” Nicks returned to offer the story of Christine McVie’s return to the band. Then Fleetwood returned with his two young daughters in tow to once again thank the crowd and return the love. It was almost as if they didn’t want to stop.

Fleetwood Mac returns to the Forum Saturday and Dec. 6 and hits the Honda Center on Dec. 7.

Set List:

The Chain
You Make Loving Fun
Dreams
Second Hand News
Rhiannon
Everywhere
I Know I’m Not Wrong
Tusk
Sisters of the Moon
Say You Love Me
Seven Wonders
Big Love
Landslide
Never Going Back Again
Over My Head
Gypsy
Little Lies
Gold Dust Woman
I’m So Afraid
Go Your Own Way

Encore:

World Turning
Don’t Stop
Silver Springs

Encore 2:

Songbird

The Bottom Line
The classic ’70s lineup is complete again with the return of Christine McVie after a 16-year absence.

Venue
The Forum
Inglewood, Calif.
(Friday, Nov. 28)

Twitter: @CraigRosen

Craig Rosen / The Hollywood Reporter / Sunday, November 30, 2014

Categories
2014-2015 On With the Show Tour

VIDEOS 11/29: The Forum, Inglewood (2)

Fleetwood Mac rocked The Forum for a second night, performing again in Inglewood on Saturday, the band’s 29th show of the tour. The Southern California concert attracted a mix of fans and celebrities, such as all-female music group Haim, who were on hand to receive Stevie’s nightly “Landslide” dedication.

COMPLETE INGLEWOOD SHOW COVERAGE: Set List | Photos | Videos

Videos

Special thanks to DancinSpazz’s channel, frenchamerican, ikepgh’s channel, jitsu1109, Amy Louff, and Stephen Silvagni for sharing these videos!

COMPILATION: You Make Loving Fun / Second Hand News / Everywhere / Big Love / Never Going Back Again / Gold Dust Woman (courtesy of Stephen Silvagni)

You Make Loving Fun (courtesy of jitsu1109)

Second Hand News (courtesy of Amy Louff)

Everywhere (courtesy of ikepgh’s channel)

I Know I’m Not Wrong (courtesy of Amy Louff)

Landslide (courtesy of ikepgh’s channel)

Landslide (courtesy of DancinSpazz’s channel)

Never Going Back Again (courtesy of Amy Louff)

Gypsy – introduction (courtesy of Lisa Wellik)

Gypsy – short clip (courtesy of Amy Louff)

Little Lies – short clip (courtesy of Amy Louff)

Go Your Own Way (courtesy of frenchamerican)

World Turning – drum solo only (courtesy of Amy Louff)

Songbird (courtesy of ikepgh’s channel)

Set List

1. The Chain 13. Landslide
2. You Make Loving Fun 14. Never Going Back Again
3. Dreams 15. Over My Head
4. Second Hand News 16. Gypsy
5. Rhiannon 17. Little Lies
6. Everywhere 18. Gold Dust Woman
7. I Know I’m Not Wrong 19. I’m So Afraid
8. Tusk 20. Go Your Own Way
9. Sisters of the Moon 21. World Turning (encore 1)
10. Say You Love Me 22. Don’t Stop
11. Seven Wonders 23. Silver Springs
12. Big Love 24. Songbird (encore 2)
Categories
2014-2015 On With the Show Tour Concert Reviews

REVIEW: Fully reunited Fleetwood Mac wows the Forum, headed to O.C.

With Christine McVie back in the fold, the band plays all its ’70s hits.

Leave it to Stevie Nicks, ever the mystical muse of Fleetwood Mac, to let us in on the secret – some combination of cosmic vibes, love and magic, and a simple cell phone call – that made the legendary band whole again some 16 years after singer and keyboard player Christine McVie retired from touring.

Yes, McVie picked up the phone and called Nicks in October 2013 to ask if she could come back to the band that had soldiered on with four-fifths of its classic lineup of Nicks, guitarist Lindsey Buckingham, bassist John McVie and drummer Mick Fleetwood. And of course Nicks told her she was welcome whenever and for always.

But that was just the product of deeper machinations in the universe, Nicks said at the close of the band’s sold-out show at the Forum on Friday, the first of four Southern California dates that includes a stop at Honda Center in Anaheim on Sunday, Dec. 7.

“I think that last year at some point in October there was there was some magical thing that went out from all our fans saying, ‘It’s time for Christine to come back,’ ” Nicks said. “We are so thrilled that we got our girl back – you have magical powers.”

That the feeling was mutual – all that love and magic, natch – was clear from the start of Fleetwood Mac’s two-and-a-half hour show and a set that in its 24 songs included many written and sung by McVie that fans here hadn’t heard since a 1997 tour that included three nights at the then-Irvine Meadows and one at the Hollywood Bowl.

Though this On With The Show tour has run for 20-some shows so far the opening number, “The Chain,” seemed a little rough at the start, the harmonies of Buckingham, Nicks and Christine McVie not quite meshing as smoothly as they should. All felt better though by the opening keyboard bit of the next song, “You Make Loving Fun,” a Christine McVie number that drew tremendous cheers as the crowd welcomed her back into the fold.

This is a band whose fights and fractures were legendary during the height of their fame. Nicks and Buckingham and the McVies each were couples, and then were not. Drug addictions and interband rivalries caused rifts even as Fleetwood Mac made some of the best albums of the era, from the self-titled “White Album” to “Rumours” and “Tusk.”

That they survived all that then is a minor miracle; that they perform as well as they do when they’re all between the ages of 65 to 71 years old must be an even sweeter success.

The show largely unfolded with the three singers taking turns on the songs they wrote and sang lead on. Early in the set that found Nicks singing “Dreams” and “Rhiannon,” the latter of which found her all a-twirl in her gauzy black shawl, bowing deeply to acknowledge the cheers at the end.

Buckingham’s “Second Hand News” and “Tusk” put a spotlight on his high-energy vocals and still-dazzling guitar work, but throughout the night it was the McVie spotlights such as “Everywhere” and “Say You Love Me” that felt just a bit more special given her absence on stage for so many years.

Given how well-known these songs all are you’d be forgiven for thinking there’d be few moments of genuine surprise or deeper emotional connection, but throughout the night many of these older tunes felt fresh in the context of the gang getting back together again.

This was the case even when it was only Buckingham on stage by himself, singing “Big Love” and talking about how the feelings of alienation he felt with the band when he wrote it have faded to meditation now, or later when Nicks joined him for a beautiful take on the always lovely “Landslide.”

Nicks was her usual endearingly hippy-dippy self, at one point giving a shout-out to the TV series “American Horror Story” for featuring the song “Seven Wonders” earlier this year and thus getting it back into their set. She later told a long and rambling anecdote about her earliest days as a singer in San Francisco pre-Fleetwood Mac and how a visit to the lady rock star clothing store later inspired the song “Gypsy.”

Highlights in the final stretch of the main set included McVie’s “Little Lies,” a take on “Gold Dust Woman” that from the ominous guitar line and cowbell opening through Nicks’ gold-shawl-twirling performance was perhaps the tour de force of the show. They closed with “Go Your Own Way” with Buckingham taking the lead vocals but both Nicks and McVie joining in as it built to the finish.

The encore opened with “World Turning,” which featured Fleetwood on an old-fashioned drawn-out drum solo that you didn’t really mind given how animated and happy he seemed, then “Don’t Stop,” which had most of the Forum singing along.

After one more break, McVie returned alone to a piano at center stage, singing “Songbird,” the nickname Fleetwood gave her during the band introductions, alone for a moment, then joined by Buckingham on guitar. A fitting final spotlight for the prodigal daughter now back in the fold.

Contact the writer: 714-796-7787 or plarsen@ocregister.com

Peter Larsen / OC Register / Saturday, November 29, 2014

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2014-2015 On With the Show Tour

VIDEOS 11/28: The Forum, Inglewood

Fleetwood Mac performed the first of three shows at the Inglewood Forum on Friday night, the band’s 28th show of the “On with the Show” Tour. Stevie mentioned that the band was “thrilled to back” in Los Angeles, after enduring a week of extremely cold weather in Canada.

As expected, celebrities and music industry figures attended the high-profile Forum show, such as One Direction’s Harry Styles who stopped to take pictures with concert goers (mostly young women).

“Fairy godmother” Stevie dedicated “Landslide” to her “fairy god daughters” Molly (John McVie’s daughter), Tessa, and Ruby (Mick Fleetwood’s daughters), who were all at Friday’s show.

COMPLETE INGLEWOOD COVERAGE: PhotosSet List | Videos | Downloads (coming soon!)

Videos

Special thanks to Cal Vid, iSayCheezAJ, Jedi Kat, Kelly L.R. Koczkur, Colleen Loew, Amy Louff, 1bionicleking, prestoff2000, SheriJH, Stephen Silvagni, E Trinidad, and Julie Wiskirchen for sharing these videos!

The Chain (Cal Vid)

You Make Loving Fun (Julie Wiskirchecn)

Dreams (Cal Vid)

Second Hand News (Cal Vid)

Rhiannon (1bionicleking)

Everywhere (Cal Vid)

I Know I’m Not Wrong (Cal Vid)

Tusk (prestoff2000)

Sisters of the Moon (Cal Vid)

Say You Love Me (1bionicleking)

Say You Love Me (Cal Vid)

Seven Wonders (Cal Vid)

Big Love (Jedi Kat)

Landslide with dedication (SheriJH)

Landslide (Cal Vid)

Landslide (iSayCheezAJ)

Never Going Back Again (Cal Vid)

Over My Head (prestoff2000)

Gypsy (Colleen Loew)

Little Lies (Cal Vid)

Gold Dust Woman (prestoff2000)

I’m So Afraid (Amy Louff)

Go Your Own Way (Cal Vid)

Go Your Own Way (E Trinidad)

Don’t Stop (Colleenn Loew)

Don’t Stop (iSayCheezAJ)

Silver Springs (Colleen Loew)

Songbird (Cal Vid)

Songbird / Stevie’s speech (Kelly L.R. Koczkur)

COMPILATION: The Chain / You Make Loving Fun / Dreams / Second Hand News / Rhiannon  / Everywhere / Tusk / Say You Love Me / Seven Wonders / Big Love (courtesy of Stephen Silvagni)


Reviews

 

Photos

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(Photo: Michael Robinson Chavez)
(Photo: Michael Robinson Chavez)
(Photo: Michael Robinson Chavez)
(Photo: Michael Robinson Chavez)
(Photo: Michael Robinson Chavez)
(Photo: Michael Robinson Chavez)

More photos at Getty Images!

Set List

1. The Chain 13. Landslide
2. You Make Loving Fun 14. Never Going Back Again
3. Dreams 15. Over My Head
4. Second Hand News 16. Gypsy
5. Rhiannon 17. Little Lies
6. Everywhere 18. Gold Dust Woman
7. I Know I’m Not Wrong 19. I’m So Afraid
8. Tusk 20. Go Your Own Way
9. Sisters of the Moon 21. World Turning (encore 1)
10. Say You Love Me 22. Don’t Stop
11. Seven Wonders 23. Silver Springs
12. Big Love 24. Songbird (encore 2)
Categories
2014-2015 On With the Show Tour

VIDEOS 11/25: SAP Center, San Jose

Fleetwood Mac performed the first of two Bay Area shows, rocking the SAP Center in San Jose on Tuesday night, the band’s 27th show of the massively successful “On With the Show Tour.” According to Live Nation, the band’s San Jose show was another sellout with more than 13,000 concert tickets purchased. Fleetwood Mac has sold out approximately 97% of the arenas in which they have performed since starting the tour in September, a figure clearly fueled by long-estranged member Christine McVie’s highly-anticipated return to the band.

Stevie dedicated “Landslide” to her best friend Robin Snyder Anderson, who succumbed to cancer in 1982, and Robin’s niece and two nephews — Emily, Dustin, and Lucas. She also dedicated the song to actor/dancer Brad Jeffries, who is best known for dancing in many of Stevie’s music videos, such as “Stand Back,” “If Anyone Falls,” and “Rooms on Fire.” Brad is from Santa Clara, California.

Stevie and Lindsey, in particular, were happy to be back in their old stomping grounds,”where the dream began,” according to Stevie, who once attended nearby San Jose State University in the late 1960s. She continued to talk adoringly about the area, making a third “Landslide” dedication to the people of San Jose. “This is for all of you in San Jose,” she told the crowd just before performing the perennial classic with Lindsey.

Fleetwood Mac returns to the Bay Area on December 3 for a show at Oracle Arena in Oakland.

Check back regularly for the most complete web coverage of Fleetwood Mac’s ON WITH THE SHOW Tour!

COMPLETE SAN JOSE COVERAGE: Photos | Reviews | Set List | Videos | Downloads (coming soon!)

Videos

Special thanks to fabutab, Paul Allen, Robert Clark, jesseriah, jungpatty4, Jim Harrington, on the Road, Maria Sanchez, and Shell4017 for sharing these videos!

The Chain (courtesy of Shell4017)

The Chain – short clip (courtesy of Jim Harrington)

Dreams (courtesy of jesseriah)

Rhiannon (courtesy of Shell4017)

Everywhere (courtesy of jesseriah)

Everywhere (courtesy of Maria Sanchez)

Seven Wonders (courtesy of Paul Allen)

Landslide with dedication (courtesy jungpatty4)

Landslide (courtesy of Paul Allen)


Over My Head (courtesy of jesseriah)

Gypsy (courtesy of Paul Allen)

Gold Dust Woman (courtesy of Robert Clark)

I’m So Afraid – solo only (courtesy of Liz Benitez)

Go Your Own Way (courtesy of jesseriah)

Go Your Own Way (courtesy of xbrutalitorx)

Go Your Own Way (on the Road)

World Turning – solo (courtesy of Shell4017)

Don’t Stop (courtesy of Paul Allen)

Silver Springs (courtesy of fabutab)

Songbird (courtesy of jesseriah)

Stevie and Mick’s closing speeches (courtesy of Kien Lam)

 

Photos

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More photos at Getty Images!

Reviews

Fleetwood Mac, Christine McVie delight fans in San Jose (Bay Area News Group)

Set List

1. The Chain 13. Landslide
2. You Make Loving Fun 14. Never Going Back Again
3. Dreams 15. Over My Head
4. Second Hand News 16. Gypsy
5. Rhiannon 17. Little Lies
6. Everywhere 18. Gold Dust Woman
7. I Know I’m Not Wrong 19. I’m So Afraid
8. Tusk 20. Go Your Own Way
9. Sisters of the Moon 21. World Turning (encore 1)
10. Say You Love Me 22. Don’t Stop
11. Seven Wonders 23. Silver Springs
12. Big Love 24. Songbird (encore 2)
Categories
2014-2015 On With the Show Tour Concert Reviews

REVIEW: Fleetwood Mac, Christine McVie delight fans in San Jose

What a difference a McVie makes.

Christine McVie’s long-awaited return to Fleetwood Mac, following a 16-year absence, paid huge dividends during the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame act’s sold-out concert on Tuesday at the SAP Center in San Jose.

It allowed the band to fully recall its commercial and artistic peak of the ’70s, when the voices of McVie, Stevie Nicks and Lindsey Buckingham combined to make Fleetwood Mac one of the world’s biggest bands.

Sure, Nicks has typically received the lioness’ share of attention, with Buckingham hogging much of what was left over. Yet, anyone who doubts the importance of McVie’s musical contributions, both on vocals and keyboards, probably didn’t catch the band’s three previous road shows — all of which were solid, but not nearly as fulfilling as what Bay Area fans witnessed with the current On with the Show Tour.

Whether you’re a longtime fan or a newcomer to the fold, this is definitely the right time to see Fleetwood Mac. Locals will have another shot when the Mac — Nicks, Buckingham, Christine McVie, drummer Mick Fleetwood and bassist John McVie — perform Dec. 3 at Oracle Arena in Oakland. Show time is 8 p.m. and tickets are $49.50-$199.50, http://www.ticketmaster.com.

The tour — the band’s first with Christine McVie since 1997’s The Dance trek — is all about the hits. Fans get to hear most of the band’s best-known songs, minus the pre-Nicks/Buckingham material of the late ’60s and early ’70s, during a mostly well-paced set that stretches over 2 ½ hours.

The reunion show kicked off in appropriate fashion, with a triumphant version of “The Chain,” the only song credited to all five band members on 1977’s 40-million-plus selling “Rumours.” The group sounded fantastic, like it had just stepped out of some time capsule sealed around 1979, as it glided and grooved through some two-dozen pop-rock songs.

The three vocalists took turns in the spotlight, with McVie — the de facto guest of honor at this party — going first and crooning through a soothing “You Make Loving Fun.” Her first line was met with applause from the crowd, obviously thrilled to once again hear her voice.

“I’d just like to say a special thanks to Fleetwood Mac … for letting me come back and do this,” McVie said to the audience early in the evening. “It’s unreal.”

She bubbled with joy, like a woman who’d just found her lost winning lottery ticket, throughout the evening. She acted like it was a privilege to be able to once again sing such songs as “Everywhere” and “Say You Love Me” — and it certainly was a privilege to hear her sing them.

The happiest person in the building, however, was former San Jose State University student Stevie Nicks, who repeatedly informed the approximately 14,000 fans in attendance that she was delighted to be back in her old stamping grounds. It was great to hear her talk so warmly — and specifically — about San Jose, a city that is routinely referred to as San Francisco during concerts by performers who really should know better.

“This is for all of you in San Jose,” Nicks said during the introduction to the gorgeous ballad “Landslide.” “Because, you know, this is where the dream began.”

Nicks benefits greatly from Christine McVie’s presence, which allows her to shoulder less of a load overall and thus pour herself more fully into her lead vocals. She was brilliant on “Rhiannon” and even better on “Sisters of the Moon.” Nicks definitely went for broke on “Seven Wonders,” a tune from 1987’s “Tango in the Night” that gained new life after being used in TV’s “American Horror Story: Coven.”

“Thank you ‘American Horror Story,'” said Nicks, who also appeared — as herself — in the series.

The concert wasn’t without some problems. The last third of the show dragged on a bit too long, as the band extended some songs well past their worth and seemed to lose sight of the finish line. Nicks’ “Gold Dust Women” should’ve delivered a concise crescendo, but instead went on and on like a lesser String Cheese Incident cut. Mick Fleetwood’s drum solo during “World Turning” was a showstopper — but in all the wrong ways. Buckingham was his usual showboat self on guitar, but he has the talent to get away with it.

In all, however, it was a triumphant return for Fleetwood Mac — and its soaring “Songbird” Christine McVie.

Jim Harrington / Bay Area News Group / Tuesday, November 25, 2014

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2014-2015 On With the Show Tour

Fleetwood Mac’s ‘Perfect’ return looms

The legendary band returns to San Diego for the second consecutive year, this time with Christine McVie back on board after a 16-year absence.

It’s a good thing pop music fans can’t always take Christine Perfect or Christine McVie at her word — both names refer to the same person — and I mean that in the nicest way possible. Her performance here next Tuesday, Dec. 2, with Fleetwood Mac at SDSU’s Viejas Arena is part of her first tour with the band in 16 years. (Ticket information appears at the conclusion of this article.)

In 1969, the year after she left the English blues-rock band Chicken Shack and a year before her debut solo album, “Christine Perfect,” was released, Perfect announced she was quitting the music business. Happily, the gifted singer, songwriter and keyboardist soon changed her mind.

In 1970, after a short, ill-fated solo tour in England, Perfect briefly quit music again. She then joined Fleetwood Mac, whose bassist, John McVie, she had married in 1968. She soon took his name and, as Christine McVie, helped Fleetwood Mac recover from the departure of its key member and musical mastermind, singer-guitarist Peter Green, and evolve into one of the world’s biggest pop-rock acts.

The McVies divorced by 1978, a year after Fleetwood Mac’s classic album, Rumours, chronicled in song the dissolution of their marriage and the romantic break-up of fellow Mac members Stevie Nicks and Lindsey Buckingham.

Buckingham quit Fleetwood Mac in 1987 to pursue a solo career. Christine McVie stopped touring with the band in 1990. After several more lineup changes, the once mighty Mac ground to a halt in 1995 — two years after the classic lineup of Buckingham, Nicks, both McVies and never-say-die drummer Mick Fleetwood reunited for one night in early 1993 to play at Bill Clinton’s presidential inauguration. (Clinton’s campaign had used the band’s 1977 hit “Don’t Stop,” one of Christine McVie’s best, as its theme song.)

The five musicians reunited in 1997 for a tour and album that she vowed would be her last with the group. True to McVie’s word, when the tour ended in 1999, she left and returned to live quietly in her English country home (which, apparently, is a castle).

Now, 16 years later, she is back in the fold, touring with Fleetwood Mac once again, a year after the group performed without her at SDSU’s Viejas Arena. Her return means the band can now reclaim “Say You Love Me,” “Songbird,” “Little Lies” and other McVie-penned gems that had been retired from the group’s concert repertoire after she left in 1999. It also means that the three-part vocal harmonies that were once such a vital and distinctive ingredient of the band’s sound have been reborn.

At 71, Christine McVie is the band’s senior member — and one of its most valuable assets. Her return coincides with bassist John McVie’s apparent recovery from the cancer that last year prompted the group to cancel its tours of Australia and New Zealand so that he could receive medical treatment.

So expect an air of double-celebration when Fleetwood Mac performs Tuesday at SDSU’s Viejas Arena. Don’t stop, indeed.

FLEETWOOD MAC: ON WITH THE SHOW

When: 8 p.m. Tuesday

Where: Viejas Arena, 5500 Canyon Crest Drive, SDSU

Tickets: Nearly sold-out (a few tickets are still available; most have been sold)

Phone: (800) 745-3000

Online:ticketmaster.com

George Varga / UT San Diego / Tuesday, November 25, 2014

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2014-2015 On With the Show Tour Concert Reviews

REVIEW: With Christine McVie back, Fleetwood Mac feels complete

Fleetwood Mac played without an asterisk Monday during a sold-out show at Sacramento’s Sleep Train Arena.

JUMP TO: Photos

The superstar band offered all it hits and all its lead singers, with Christine McVie having returned to the road after a 16-year absence.

McVie was elegant and unassuming Monday, just as she was during the band’s “Rumours” heyday. Chic in black jeans and a leather jacket, the 71-year-old singer/keyboard player seemed happy to be back, whether she was in the spotlight or assuming a utility role by playing accordion on “Tusk,” the still-wild-and-weird title single from Fleetwood Mac’s 1979 album.

McVie was not so unassuming that you did not notice, when the band kicked into the McVie-led “You Make Loving Fun” as its second song of the night, that an intact Mac beats the four-fifths crew that toured in her absence.

The band’s 1970s and ’80s success lay in its musical diversity. In how it made room for McVie’s graceful melodies, Stevie Nicks’ airy poetry and Lindsey Buckingham’s more coiled, intense songwriting, then joined those styles in a signature sound cemented by three-part harmonies.

Mac minus McVie still entertained in concert, with Nicks tapping her distinctive, raspy vocals, witchy-woman vibe and giant-rock-star stage presence, Buckingham quick-picking his guitar and exploiting his own considerable charisma, and Mick Fleetwood going mad on drums.

But those shows never felt like complete Mac. Not like the Mac that killed it Monday night on the band’s McVie-led 1987 hit “Little Lies.” A harmony bonanza, the song sounds edgier live than on record.

No one looked happier to see McVie than Buckingham, the band’s creative engine and biggest champion. McVie’s return, Buckingham said, marked a new period for the band that appeared likely to be “poetic” and “prolific.”

For a 65-year-old to be mapping out a rock ‘n’ roll future with a 71-year-old (and with Nicks, 66, Mick Fleetwood, 67, and bassist John McVie, who turns 69 Wednesday) is inspiring. It also speaks to why the group endures, 37 years after “Rumours” and its surrounding excess and romantic strife. It’s through Buckingham’s sheer will.

Christine McVie’s road rustiness showed at times Monday, especially during the ballad “Songbird,” during which she clearly had trouble hitting notes. But even at these moments, the band was better with her than without her. The notes might not all still be there, but the reassuring, husky quality of her voice is.

McVie seemed shy as she thanked her bandmates and fans for their support. Nicks was not shy at any point. Not when turning “Gold Dust Woman” into a welcome bit of performance art involving a sparkly shawl, or when regaling the audience with a story from her days as a Bay Area rock baby.

She was in a band with Buckingham that once opened for acts such as Jimi Hendrix and Janis Joplin. After Nicks discovered all the famous San Francisco rock women shopped at a boutique called Velvet Underground (which Nicks name checks in “Gypsy”), she visited the store.

She couldn’t afford anything in it, Nicks told the crowd. But she had an epiphany while there, that one day she would be famous and play for big crowds. It happened, Nicks said, gesturing toward the 15,000 people watching her in Sleep Train Arena.

You gotta love Nicks for barely bothering with the “humble” part of humble bragging. But why bother with humility? Nicks has been an icon for decades.

“Icon” gets used too often. But add up Nicks’ one-of-a-kind, nasal-yet-pleasant singing voice, shawls, scarves, all-summer-long boots and the creation, last year, of an “American Horror Story: Coven” witch character who worshipped the singer, and there it is: icon.

Now that you know to whom the term legitimately can be applied, don’t go calling Taylor Swift an icon.

Call The Bee’s Carla Meyer, (916) 321-1118. Follow her on Twitter @CarlaMeyerSB

Carla Meyer / Sacramento Bee / Tuesday, November 25, 2014

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2014-2015 On With the Show Tour

VIDEOS 11/24: Sleep Train Arena, Sacramento

Fleetwood Mac made its first appearance of the tour in the Golden State, performing in the state’s capital on Monday night. The band heads south tonight to the Bay Area, where they will perform at SAP Center in San Jose, with additional California shows in Inglewood, San Diego, Anaheim, and Oakland in the coming weeks.

Stevie and Lindsey dedicated “Landslide” to longtime friend Bob Fogle, who lives in the Sacramento area.

“So Bob Fogle, this is dedicated to you, from your two pals Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks.”

Complete Tour Coverage: Photos | Videos | Reviews | Set List

Photo Gallery

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Videos

Special thanks to Anthony Lombardo, Scott Seibel, and Josh Smith for sharing these videos!

The Chain (courtesy of Josh Smith)

Tusk (courtesy of Josh Smith)

Tusk (courtesy of Scott Seibel)

Big Love (courtesy of Josh Smith)

Landslide (courtesy of Josh Smith)

World Turning / Band introductions / Don’t Stop (courtesy of Josh Smith)

World Turning – drum solo (courtesy of Anthony Lombardo)

Reviews

With Christine McVie, Fleetwood Mac feels complete (Sacramento Bee)

Set List

1. The Chain 13. Landslide
2. You Make Loving Fun 14. Never Going Back Again
3. Dreams 15. Over My Head
4. Second Hand News 16. Gypsy
5. Rhiannon 17. Little Lies
6. Everywhere 18. Gold Dust Woman
7. I Know I’m Not Wrong 19. I’m So Afraid
8. Tusk 20. Go Your Own Way
9. Sisters of the Moon 21. World Turning (encore 1)
10. Say You Love Me 22. Don’t Stop
11. Seven Wonders 23. Silver Springs
12. Big Love 24. Songbird (encore 2)
Categories
2014-2015 On With the Show Tour Concert Reviews

REVIEW: Fleetwood Mac at Moda Center, 11/22

Growing up, I hated Fleetwood Mac. Maybe part of the problem was I usually lumped them in with the Eagles, a band that is truly terrible, or with my general distaste for classic rock dinosaurs, borne from a childhood spent listening to Phil Collins and Sting greatest hit tapes on every single family roadtrip. Nirvana and Pearl Jam and Hole hit right when I got my first Discman, and soon after, my older next-door neighbor was giving me Radiohead and Built to Spill albums. Fleetwood Mac weren’t just uncool: They were the bloated, overwrought excess of everything a young indie-rock fan and Spin subscriber stood against. But then in college, a close friend lent me a copy of Tusk, saying it was their White Album and also the one where the band’s drug use was a little too intense. I grew older, went through a few breakups, and grew to truly love my former enemies.

Fleetwood Mac have been touring a lot the past few years (including an appearance at the Moda Center just last year), but the big news here is the return of Christine McVie after a 16-year absence. Though billed as the “On with the Show” tour, there was nothing resigned about the performance Saturday night, except the few moments when the New Age-y visuals recalled a Cialis commercial. Snark aside, this really was a wonderful show. The whole band seemed genuinely stoked to have McVie back in the fold, as most of the pre-song banter featured Stevie Nicks and Lindsey Buckingham or even Mick Fleetwood gushing about being able to play with her again. Fleetwood Mac has played most of these songs hundreds of times but they were still loose and nimble onstage, occasionally stretching out a song but never indulging in that classic rock trope of just jamming forever, man.

The hits from Rumours—”Dreams,” “Go Your Own Way,” “Gold Dust Woman”—naturally got the biggest responses, and the band smiled its way through through every moment. They were augmented by three backup singers and two sidemen on guitar and keyboards, but the mix was always light, centering on Nicks’ husky voice, Buckingham’s exciting guitar playing and the subtle backbone of the rhythm section, which just kept on beating amidst a sea of 20,000 people singing along to every single word.

But for me, the real pleasure was when the band dived deeper into their back catalogue, dusting off gems like “Tusk” and Tango in the Night’s “Little Lies” and “Big Love,” which Buckingham performed solo while showing off his incredible fingerpicked guitar playing. I nearly died when he played “I Know I’m Not Wrong,” my favorite song off Tusk and easily the most amusing song of the night visually, with his dismembered floating head projected on the screen behind the band mouthing the words through a sea of colorful clouds. Buckingham really is an amazing performer—at 65 years old, rocking skinny jeans and a tight black v-neck, he seems much younger than most of his contemporaries. Though not usually recognized as a guitar hero, his solos were revelatory, never overshadowing the song but pushing each hit to new heights.

During the encore, I realized this might be the first show I’ve ever seen without an opening band. I mean, who could realistically open for Fleetwood Mac? When Mick launched into a call-and-response drum solo during “World Turning,” I initially wanted to hate on the showmanship, but I actually found it rather endearing, just like when he came out front to play a smaller kit during a nice late set stretch of songs that included “Over My Head.” Sure, it was a little cheesy. But sometimes, we have to know when we are wrong, and just embrace the kitsch.

Michael Mannheimer / Willamette Week / Sunday, November 23, 2014

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2014-2015 On With the Show Tour

VIDEOS 11/22: Moda Center, Portland

On Saturday, Fleetwood Mac performed at the Moda Center at the Rose Quarter in Portland, their 25th show of the tour.

COMPLETE TOUR COVERAGE: Reviews | Set List

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Videos

Special thanks to Christy Edwards, McKenna Grace Fisher, Michele Mielcarz, pokeadoubledecker, and smeagma for sharing these videos!

You Make Loving Fun (courtesy of McKenna Grace Fisher)

Dreams (courtesy of McKenna Grace Fisher)

Second Hand News (courtesy of pokeadoubledecker)

Rhiannon (courtesy of McKenna Grace Fisher)

Everywhere (courtesy of pokeadoubledecker)

Seven Wonders (courtesy of Christy Edwards)

Landslide (courtesy of Christy Edwards)

Over My Head (courtesy of pokeadoubledecker)

Gold Dust Woman (courtesy of Michele Mielcarz)

I’m So Afraid (courtesy of pokeadoubledecker)

Go Your Own Way (courtesy of smeagma)

Silver Springs (courtesy of Christy Edwards)

Reviews

 

Set List

1. The Chain 13. Landslide
2. You Make Loving Fun 14. Never Going Back Again
3. Dreams 15. Over My Head
4. Second Hand News 16. Gypsy
5. Rhiannon 17. Little Lies
6. Everywhere 18. Gold Dust Woman
7. I Know I’m Not Wrong 19. I’m So Afraid
8. Tusk 20. Go Your Own Way
9. Sisters of the Moon 21. World Turning (encore 1)
10. Say You Love Me 22. Don’t Stop
11. Seven Wonders 23. Silver Springs
12. Big Love 24. Songbird (encore 2)
Categories
2014-2015 On With the Show Tour Concert Reviews

REVIEW: Fleetwood Mac plays hit after greatest hit

Fleetwood Mac
Moda Center at the Rose Quarter
Portland

“Sweet wonderful you,” Christine McVie sang, all smiles. “You make me happy with the things you do.”

That was pretty much the vibe at Fleetwood Mac’s concert at the Moda Center on Saturday night; five senior citizens touring again for the first time in 16 years, playing their hits like time stopped and it was 1979 again, with more hugs and without all the cocaine. McVie’s decision to return created a pocket of warmth on the left side of the stage and energized her bandmates, who couldn’t stop talking about how happy it made them to play with “our beautiful Christine,” as Lindsey Buckingham called her. Here’s a review in the form of an annotated setlist, 20 songs deep:

“The Chain”: Christine comes out and slides behind her keyboards like she’s never been away, 71 and looking great. Stevie Nicks is center stage, Buckingham is stage right, Mick Fleetwood atop a huge drum kit, John McVie almost invisible in a cap and red vest. There are two extra musicians behind the McVies and three backup singers, providing a fuller sound that’s immediately put to use on the chorus. First impression: Buckingham is really on it, breaking off a clean solo with that amazing fingerpicking technique.

“You Make Loving Fun”: Christine’s first solo vocal of the evening is strong and clear — that’s what 16 years off will do for your voice. She once wrote a song called “Warm Ways,” and warmth is the best word to describe her. She’s Christine Perfect from the Lake District of England, and it’s lovely to see her back onstage.

“Dreams”: Any band is a brand, and a band as big as Fleetwood Mac creates and maintains a brand that stays in people’s minds and brings them to a concert where the newest songs were recorded 26 years ago. The brand doesn’t change, the songs stay on the radio and sound as fresh as ever, but the players — the ones that only love you when they’re playing — get older. All the members of Fleetwood Mac are at least 65 and have been performing since they were teenagers. Time waits for no one.

Which is one way of saying that Stevie Nicks’ voice, always husky and evocative, sometimes sounds hoarse and flat, like it did on the first verse of “Dreams.”

“Second Hand News”: Fleetwood, who loves a kick-drum intro, pounded it out and Buckingham took it from there. Short and sweet.

“Rhiannon”: Nicks put on her black witch shawl and vamped a little as the rear-screen projection flashed some images that were a combination of “The Lord of the Rings” and “The Song Remains the Same.” And speaking of Tolkien, if Fleetwood Mac was “The Lord of the Rings” then Mick would be Gandalf, John McVie would be Samwise Gamgee, Buckingham would be Aragorn, Christine would be Gimli, and Stevie would be Frodo, keeper of the Ring.

“Everywhere”: Christine thanked the audience — warmly, sincerely — and sang one of her hits.

“I Know I’m Not Wrong”: Welcome to the Lindsey Buckingham show. He gave a little rap about how having Christine back “feels very circular,” then played the first of two numbers from “Tusk,” his masterpiece (but not the band’s).

“Tusk”: Slow build led by Buckingham, Christine strapped on an accordion (not that you could hear it), and the light show morphed into the famous USC marching band footage. Worked for me.

“Sisters of the Moon”: Stevie’s found her voice! Maybe the lower register fits the 2014 Stevie. This song is the one Stevie lovers love most.

“Say You Love Me”: Christine’s songs are all about love, pure and true. The lyrics are direct and sincere and timeless. Is it possible to have a crush on a woman old enough to be your mother?

“Seven Wonders”: More grooviness from Her Royal Stevieness, wrapped up with a shout-out to “American Horror Story” for bringing the song back around.

“Big Love”: Why did Buckingham never become a solo star the way Nicks did? He has so much talent: great voice, charisma, brilliant, unusual guitar technique, outstanding writer and performer. The biggest reason why Fleetwood Mac was so successful the late 1970s was it had three songwriters — Buckingham, Nicks, Christine McVie — coming up with one radio-friendly classic after another. But somebody had to be the boss and bring the sound into a whole live and in the studio, and that person was Buckingham. He was the driving force, the Lennon and the McCartney on “Rumours” and definitely on “Tusk,” and it took so much out of him that he quit after “Tango in the Night,” the last studio album with this lineup and originally a Buckingham solo album. He’s been the backbone of all the tours for the last 25 years and it seems to me forgotten as a live performer by those who see Fleetwood Mac as an oldies band. (Which they are, let’s face it.)

“Landslide”: Hearing Stevie play this is like hearing Neil Young play “Old Man.” They’ve grown into the song, and it means more now.

“Never Going Back Again”: Slow and easy, Buckingham whispered his vocal. He hugged Nicks when it was over.

“Over My Head”: “I wrote this one in 1975,” Christine said. Fleetwood’s out front, playing a smaller kit.

“Gypsy”: Long, funny introduction from Stevie about being in a band in San Francisco, going into a hippie clothing store called The Velvet Underground, following your dreams, etc. Best video of the night: rainy San Francisco, kinda noir. Lighting strikes, maybe once, maybe twice. Stevie spins!

“Little Lies”: The last top 10 hit for Fleetwood Mac, unless “American Horror Story” uses a deep cut from “Tusk” or something.

“Gold Dust Woman”: Stevie shuffled across the stage, and for a minute I wasn’t sure she was going to make it back. Cool outro from Ms. Nicks.

“I’m So Afraid”: The first of three big fat highlights for me. I love the desperate isolation in the lyric, and then Buckingham shredded a showcase solo. It’s one thing to finger-pick an acoustic, but getting that kind of big sound out of an electric without a pick is fascinating to watch.

“Go Your Own Way”: Buckingham was out of breath after “I’m So Afraid”; Nicks put on a top hat and waved to the fans. Cell phones light up before the encore. The woman next to me pulled out a lighter and people congratulated her.

“World Turning”: The first song of the encore meant a drum solo for Fleetwood.

“Don’t Stop”: The one song in the Fleetwood Mac catalog that feels overplayed. It’s not you, it’s me.

“Silver Springs”: (Highlight No. 2) How great an album is “Rumours” that this beauty didn’t make the cut? The flip side of “Go Your Own Way,” maybe Stevie’s loveliest lyric. She saved her best performance for last, and thanked the fans for remembering the song. Who can forget?

“Songbird”: (Highlight No. 3): Christine at a grand piano, Buckingham at her side, playing another wide-open love song, wedding music for a generation of happy couples, at least on that day. It’s all right. I know it’s right.

Jeff Baker / The Oregonian / Sunday, November 23, 2014

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2014-2015 On With the Show Tour

REVIEW: Fleetwood Mac wows capacity crowd in Tacoma

Fleetwood Mac at Tacoma Dome with Christine McVie like a family reunion

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With the return of singer-pianist Christine McVie after a 16-year absence, a re-energized Fleetwood Mac wowed a near-capacity crowd with a powerful, sometimes explosive concert Thursday, Nov. 20, at the Tacoma Dome.

“Our songbird has returned,” drummer Mick Fleetwood proclaimed gleefully in a nearly three-hour show packed with such classic songs as “Dreams,” “Second Hand News,” “Sisters of the Moon,” “Rhiannon,” “Gold Dust” and “Go Your Own Way.”

Indeed, McVie’s spotlight performance of “Songbird,” with accompaniment by guitarist Lindsey Buckingham, was the soaring finale in a triumphant show celebrating her return. Despite her many years off the road, McVie, 71, sounded as though she had never left.

She was clearly an inspiration to her fellow bandmates, who treated the show like a family reunion. The crowd cheered as she sang, “This feeling follows me wherever I go,” from “You Make Loving Fun,” bringing back memories of the band’s heyday for an audience dominated by exuberant baby boomers.

“Welcome back, Chris,” said singer Stevie Nicks, who joined McVie on songs they had not sung together in more than a decade.

Rounding out the veteran rock band were longtime bassist John McVie, as well as three background singers and an additional guitarist and keyboardist.

The show featured dreamy, sometimes eye-popping videos and neon-colored lighting. Musically, there were many special moments.

Buckingham reprised his vigorous, guitar-driven song, “Big Love,” explaining that its focus had changed over the years to reflect his changing view of the world and greater maturity. The ominous-sounding “Tusk” featured Christine McVie on accordion, though her playing was somewhat lost in the mix of instruments.

Explaining that “Landslide” was one of her father’s favorite songs, Nicks dedicated the haunting tune to several women in the audience and dedicated “Gypsy” to young people who choose to believe in themselves and follow a dream.

During “World Turning,” the opening song of a first encore, Fleetwood offered an explosive drum solo.

Before leaving the stage, Fleetwood delivered an impassioned message to fans, thanking them for years of support, urging them to take care of one another and promising many more shows to come.

“The Mac is definitely back,” he bellowed.

Gene Stout / Seattle Times / Friday, November 21, 2014

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2014-2015 On With the Show Tour

VIDEOS 11/20: Tacoma Dome, Tacoma

On Thursday, Fleetwood Mac performed at the Tacoma Dome in Tacoma, WA, their 24th show of the tour. The band ends the month with shows in Portland, Sacramento, San Jose, and Los Angeles.

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Videos

Special thanks to Keara Flynn, Michael Oxman, reswedi, and sdintn for sharing these videos!

The Chain (courtesy of Michael Oxman)

Say You Love Me (courtesy of Michael Oxman)

Landslide (courtesy of reswedi)

Never Going Back Again (courtesy of Keara Flynn)

Over My Head (courtesy of Michael Oxman)

Gypsy (courtesy of Michael Oxman)

Gypsy (courtesy of sdintn)

Little Lies (courtesy of Michael Oxman)

Reviews

Fleetwood Mac wows capacity crowd (Seattle Times)

Set List

1. The Chain 13. Landslide
2. You Make Loving Fun 14. Never Going Back Again
3. Dreams 15. Over My Head
4. Second Hand News 16. Gypsy
5. Rhiannon 17. Little Lies
6. Everywhere 18. Gold Dust Woman
7. I Know I’m Not Wrong 19. I’m So Afraid
8. Tusk 20. Go Your Own Way
9. Sisters of the Moon 21. World Turning (encore 1)
10. Say You Love Me 22. Don’t Stop
11. Seven Wonders 23. Silver Springs
12. Big Love 24. Songbird (encore 2)
Categories
2014-2015 On With the Show Tour

REVIEW: Fleetwood Mac’s renaissance more than ‘Rumours’ in Vancouver

“Sweet, wonderful you.”

These three simple words produced the biggest cheer in Vancouver last night. Written and sung by Christine McVie, they heralded her return to the band after an 18-year absence, as a full-strength Fleetwood Mac reclaimed their throne as soft rock’s all-time greatest band in a packed-to-the-rafters Rogers Arena.

McVie’s “You Make Loving Fun” was part of an opening barrage of hits from “Rumours” – beginning with “The Chain” and including “Dreams” and “Second Hand News,” the sequence only interrupted by the equally excellent “Rhiannon.”

Not that the band were playing it safe with nothing but fan favourites. A quick trip into the “Tusk” album delivered the title track and Lindsey Buckingham’s quirky, punk-tinged “I Know I’m Not Wrong,” soon followed by a brace of lesser-known Stevie Nicks ballads, “Sister Moon” and “Seven Wonders.”

The songs, many of which were approaching 40, weren’t showing their age. Neither was the band. McVie and Buckingham both oozed style in perfectly-tailored leather jackets, while Nicks’ distinctly flowing fashion, while perhaps starting to resemble a 1970s Miss Havisham, still demonstrated that she knew how to dress and act like a proper rock star. The super-tight, unfussy rhythm section of John McVie and Mick Fleetwood were, for reasons best known to themselves, dressed as The Wurzels.

Not that anyone noticed. The excitement was happening at the front of the stage, where three massive musical talents were sharing, perhaps competing, for the spotlight.

Centre stage, in position at least, was the magnificent Stevie Nicks. Wisely avoiding repeating her “Thank you Toronto” gaff from her last visit to Vancouver, she remained the most theatrical member of the band, concluding every song with a sweep of her arms and a flamboyant bow. Her voice perhaps isn’t what it once was, but that doesn’t mean that her songs, highlighted by “Landslide,” “Gypsy” and a lengthy “Gold Dust Woman” have lost any of their melodic or lyrical potency. Soft rock with bite.

Voice. Guitar. Stage presence. Songs. The dictionary runs out of superlatives when describing the talent of Lindsey Buckingham. Delivering searing brilliance every time he stepped to the mic or demonstrated his unique guitar style, midway through the concert his bandmates left him alone on the stage armed only with an acoustic guitar. After an obtuse introduction, describing the song “Big Love” as “a meditation on the power and importance of change,” he dropped the jaws of an entire arena with a devastating display of guitar technique, repeating the trick five minutes later as Nicks joined him on stage to lend harmonies to “Never Going Back.”

But the night belonged to Fleetwood Mac’s prodigal daughter, Christine McVie. Although lacking Nicks’ flair for the dramatic and Buckingham’s immense musical dexterity, the simple fact that she’d taken her prolonged break from the stage made hearing impeccably sung, elegantly simple songs like “Say You Love Me,” “Little Lies” and the finale of “Songbird,” played on a grand piano as Buckingham added delicate guitar lines, moments to treasure.

After two and a quarter hours of high quality vintage rock (including masterful versions of “Go Your Own Way” and “Don’t Stop”) Nicks and the eternally weird Mick Fleetwood both took their turns at the mic to thank the crowd and laud the return of Christine McVie.

Whether this is really a new chapter in this wonderful band’s lengthy story is still unclear. Sometimes a reminder of greatness is more than enough.

Robert Collins / CTV Vancouver / Wednesday, November 19, 2014

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2014-2015 On With the Show Tour

VIDEOS 11/18: Rogers Arena, Vancouver

On Tuesday, Fleetwood Mac performed at Rogers Arena in Vancouver, their 23rd show of the tour.

Stevie dedicated “Landslide” to actress Lily Rabe, who played “the super hot, fantastic witch” Misty Day on FX’s horror show American Horror Story: Coven. Stevie credited Lily’s character and the show’s producer Ryan Murphy for exposing Fleetwood Mac’s music to a younger generation.

“It took our music to a younger generation of people. And, I want to thank you, Lily, for that, and Ryan, and all the people involved in it because it really did. Seven Wonders, we would never be doing ‘Seven Wonders’ if it hadn’t been for American Horror Story. So Lily Rabe, Misty Day, should have been Supreme Witch, this is for you, ‘Landslide.'”

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Videos

Special thanks to Andy Barned, dobwat, dougallmac, escapeartist74, D Gavi, gay concert dude, Coral Gilbert, Richard Smith, and tforucla for sharing these videos!

The Chain (courtesy of escapeartist74)

You Make Loving Fun (courtesy of escapeartist74)

Dreams (courtesy of escapeartist74)

Rhiannon (courtesy of escapeartist74)

Rhiannon (courtesy of D Galvi)

Everywhere (courtesy of escapeartist74)

I Know I’m Not Wrong (courtesy of escapeartist74)

Tusk (courtesy of escapeartist74)

Say You Love Me (courtesy of escapeartist74)

Seven Wonders (courtesy of dobat)

Big Love (courtesy of dobwat)

Landslide (courtesy of escapeartist74)

Landslide (courtesy of tforucla)

Never Going Back Again (courtesy of escapeartist74)

Over My Head (courtesy of escapeartist74)

Gypsy (courtesy of D Gavi)

Little Lies (courtesy of gay concert dude)

Gold Dust Woman (courtesy of Andy Barned)

Go Your Own Way – partial (courtesy of Richard Smith)

Go Your Own Way (courtesy of dougallmac)

Don’t Stop (courtesy of Coral Gilbert)

Don’t Stop (courtesy of dougallmac)

Songbird (courtesy of dobwat)

Reviews

Set List

1. The Chain 13. Landslide
2. You Make Loving Fun 14. Never Going Back Again
3. Dreams 15. Over My Head
4. Second Hand News 16. Gypsy
5. Rhiannon 17. Little Lies
6. Everywhere 18. Gold Dust Woman
7. I Know I’m Not Wrong 19. I’m So Afraid
8. Tusk 20. Go Your Own Way
9. Sisters of the Moon 21. World Turning (encore 1)
10. Say You Love Me 22. Don’t Stop
11. Seven Wonders 23. Silver Springs
12. Big Love 24. Songbird (encore 2)
Categories
2014-2015 On With the Show Tour

REVIEW: Fleetwood Mac back on track

‘Welcome back Chris, where ya been?’ Fleetwood Mac back on track with everybody on board

Rogers Arena
Vancouver, British Columbia
Tuesday, November 18, 2014

So there was a missing piece. And her name is Christine “Perfect” McVie.

Last time through town, Fleetwood Mac was solid but something was certainly missing and the performance was forced.

All the guitar licks Lindsey Buckingham could pull from his considerable bag of tricks couldn’t replace that key third voice in the band. For many fans, it is keyboardist/singer Christine’s full bluesy pipes that make the group, rather than Stevie Nicks nasal hippie twang.

“Welcome back Chris, where ya been?” chided Nicks and it was clear the jibe fell flat with McVie. “Let’s move right along.”

Everything about the show was improved having her back. It played harder and the five musicians seemed self-contained to the point you hardly noticed the three back-up singers and two additional musicians standing in the shadows.

The quarrels and open discord between Nicks, Buckingham, McVie, bassist John McVie and the band’s namesake, drummer Mick Fleetwood is the stuff of rock legend. But the group that began as a top-rank blues rock unit attained pop superstardom with this line-up and it certainly is at its best together.

Two albums alone — the self-titled Fleetwood Mac (1975) and Rumours (1977) — form most of the setlist. A few hits from Tusk, Tango In the Night and Mirage round it out. But the quintet can probably keep packing arenas until the singers can’t hit any of those wonderfully off-key but right in-the-pocket harmonies that are its signature.

The amount of the audience that could have been conceived to Songbird or Don’t Stop was considerable.

Opening with The Chain, Dreams, Second Hand News and Rhiannon got the crowd to its feet. When Christine took lead for a fast version of the hit Everywhere things hit a highlight.

The love-in was on stage and off. Christine thanked her bandmates for having her back, Buckingham said her return signalled a new chapter for the band. Yet the set list was all 30-plus years old.

Nobody is holding their breath to buy new ‘Mac.

But the band could pull some Peter Green-era gems such as Oh Well or The Green Manalishi into the set and most would think they were new. There were some jewels on Bare Trees and Kiln House too.

Who am I kidding? Just throw to TV’s American Horror Story using tried and true Fleetwood Mac tracks and skip any messing with the winning formula.

People came to dance in the aisles to Christine singing Say That You Love Me and to sing-along to Nicks’ signature Landslide. Even if Fleetwood Mac is nothing more than a touring greatest hits package deal, it’s a revitalized one with the full force of the five musicians.

How interesting to see that this long in its career, putting that key piece back into the puzzle still makes everything better.

Nicks sounded the best she has in ages, freed from shouldering the lion’s share of singing duties. Buckingham was reined in on the endless solos and fleshing out the setlist with solo tunes. The rhythm section pulsed rather than shuffled.

No surprises, but the pleasant one of a band in flight.

Sderdeyn@theprovince.com

Twitter.com/StuartDerdeyn

© Copyright (c) The Province

Stuart Derdeyn / The Province / Tuesday, November 18, 2014

Categories
2014-2015 On With the Show Tour

REVIEW: Fleetwood Mac plays to its strengths

For a band so relentlessly intent in telling us to forget yesterday – as in their 1977 hit Don’t Stop, Fleetwood Mac sure makes a lot of money keeping the past alive, as evidenced by the full house at Rexall Place Saturday night on their current “On With the Show” Tour.

In the years before hooking up with Stevie Nicks and Lindsey Buckingham, Fleetwood Mac was a plodding and increasingly irrelevant UK blues act that was chronically unable to hang on to a succession of gifted guitarists – from Peter Green to Jeremy Spencer to Danny Kirwan. They seemed destined for the dustbin of rock ‘n’ roll history – until Americans Nicks and Buckingham breathed new life into the band with their folk tinged, moody So-Cal sound, a life that continues to resonate loudly all these years later.

The band knocked the evening’s first chunk off the old ball of rock with The Chain, one of nine songs the band played off their 1977 magnum opus Rumours, and a reminder of the value of relationships through the years. Given the band’s storied and sordid internal history, the rhythmic tribal drumming, resplendent chorus, and energetic performance was evidence enough for the band’s current degree of musical viability. These aren’t spring chickens here – the average age of this band is 67.5, with Lindsey Buckingham tipping the young end of the scale at the OAS-receiving age of 65 – yet they sounded fresh and full of life, as if to tell us that living in yesterday is doing a pretty good job of keeping these guys alive today.

Fleetwood Mac GigCity EdmontonWhen your head is in the clouds, your feet aren’t always on the ground, as evidenced by Stevie Nicks in her little mid-set tale about her rise to rock stardom. Without the tiniest smidgeon of irony, she excitedly told the overwhelmingly middle aged crowd that they could live their dreams, too, and be rock stars if they wanted. I wonder how many 56-year-olds in the crowd planned to take her up on that one.

Philosophers – or realists – they aren’t, but musicians with significant pedigree they are. Their two-plus hour set focused mostly on songs from only two albums – including 1975′s self titled release – and as such was an easy listener’s wet dream. As the band effortlessly drove their way from Dreams to Rhiannon and back, Christine McVie – her 22nd show since reuniting with the band earlier this year – looked classy even with her understated stage presence, and sounded even better on Say You Love Me and You Make Loving Fun, a potential bomb of Captain & Tennille proportions for those of lesser ability and experience than her.

Band members seemed to know their roles, letting the other shine when it was their time, and coming in the spotlight when if was their turn. Nicks had her moments during Gypsy and Gold Dust Woman, trading off the image she has cultivated for herself over the years. If style could be trademarked, Loreena McKennitt would be sued for copyright infringement. “Iconic” is one of the few words to describe Nicks.

Buckingham, by far the most energetic member of the band, took off on numerous instrumental excursions – acoustic during Never Going Back Again, and electric during the minor chord driven tour de force I’m So Afraid. With his bizarre finger flicking picking style, it’s amazing how he is able to fret some of those notes accurately. Rest assured, thanks to Jumbotron, that was him blazing away in a solo that moodily wound its way up and around a spiral staircase into sheer musical ecstasy. Deservedly, the song’s completion brought the crowd to its feet.

The production company responsible for the projection screens above and behind the band deserves praise for stylish, sumptuous use of warm colours, and breathtakingly beautiful background imagery that was clearly constructed to evoke the particular mood of the song in mind. For a band whose members don’t move around much, the warm, arresting images definitely made for a more evocative performance. The show looked as fantastic as it sounded.

Fleetwood Mac’s success is akin to the success of self help books. People seem to have a bottomless desire to hear simple universal messages over and over and over again: Go your own way, don’t stop thinking about tomorrow, live your dreams, yes, we get it. While some may knock the redundancy in the art form, you can’t fault the band for playing to their strengths.

Derek Owen / Gig City / Sunday, November 2014