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Lindsey Buckingham

Lindsey Buckingham performs post-surgery

Lindsey Buckingham plays guitar for first since open-heart surgery, as daughter sings ‘Landslide.’

Lindsey Buckingham has performed publicly for this first time since his open-heart surgery nearly four months ago, playing guitar to accompany his high-school daughter and her graduating class on their rendition of a classic Fleetwood Mac hit.

“Last night was epic,” tweeted Buckingham’s wife, Kristen Buckingham, who suggested that this might have been his first private performance since the surgery, too. “First time I’ve seen Lindsey play in the last 4 mos, all the while Leelee ending her high school career. AND she sings a little ‘Landslide’ with her dad. I cried, I’ll admit it. Never know what’s ahead so enjoy the moment…”​

She shared a video clip of the performance on Instagram.

View this post on Instagram

Last night 💫✨

A post shared by Kristen Buckingham (@kbchrush) on

That the song they performed was not one of his compositions, but one by Stevie Nicks was seen by some fans as possible evidence of a growing spirit of forgiveness between estranged former bandmates. But it could just as easily be a nod to Buckingham’s contributions to the song, or an indication that high school chorales naturally gravitate to “Landslide” more than, say, “I’m So Afraid.”

An earlier Instagram post from Kristen Buckingham showed Leelee posing in a USC shirt, indicating that their daughter may be in for a lot of marching band versions of “Tusk” over the next four years.

Left unaddressed by the instrumental performance is the state of Buckingham’s voice, first raised by his wife in a statement following the surgery in early February. At that time, she said, “While he and his heart are doing well, the surgery resulted in vocal cord damage. While it is unclear if the damage is permanent, we are hopeful it is not.” Later in that month, she added, “Considering the massively invasive surgery, he is doing really well. Each day things get a little easier, but it is a slow process and sometimes a frustrating one.”

Kristen Buckingham has not re-addressed the subject of Lindsey’s vocal cord damage since — although she has responded to updated accounts of the split between Buckingham and the rest of the group in 2018, and how it reportedly came down to a he-goes-or-I-go ultimatum from Nicks following perceived friction at a MusiCares tribute dinner at the beginning of that year.

“They were togther at MusiCares and got along great,” Kristen Buckingham wrote in response to fan inquiries in March. “She has never spoken to him since and he has reached out repeatedly with no response. I guess she decided she didn’t like him anymore? Any conversation would have been nice. Reminds me of being really young and immature. When I wanted out of a relationship, for no real reason, I looked for and found some excuse to make it easy for me to break up instead of facing the truth. The ugly truth that I was just shitty. Girls, you know this move right?” She also directly addressed Mick Fleetwood: “You are so busy telling the world how ‘unhappy’ the band was. It would have been nice if you told Lindsey that. He’s still wondering what happened. You are a dishonest coward and I have zero respect for you. That goes for all of you FM, you really suck.”

Back in February, Kristen shared a photo of herself with Lindsey in recovery after surgery, writing, “Our family thought it important to share what’s happening with Lindsey with the hope that inspires someone else to seek preventative care. Lindsey’s family has a history of heart issues, having lost both his father at 56 and his brother at 46 to heart related illness. If anyone is experiencing even the mildest of symptoms we encourage you to seek the care of a physician. We are so thankful for the kind and generous love given by the people surrounding Lindsey, me and our kids throughout this emotional time.”

Kristen had also taken to social media in recent months to offer their family’s support to another rocker who found himself in something of the same boat. “Wishing @MickJagger a speedy recovery!” she tweeted.

Chris Willman / Variety / Monday, May 20, 2019

Categories
Fleetwood Mac (1975)

Hear Early Version of ‘Landslide’ from upcoming deluxe reissue

Fleetwood Mac has released an early version of “Landslide” from the forthcoming deluxe reissue of Fleetwood Mac (1975). The early version features a different vocal from Stevie Nicks with simple guitar work from Lindsey Buckingham, much like how it’s performed today onstage.

Fleetwood Mac Deluxe will be released on Friday, January 19 and can be pre-ordered now.

Categories
Landslide

They’re Playing My Song: Landslide

Section: Songwriters & Publishers

“LANDSLIDE”
Written by Stevie Nicks
Published by Welsh Witch
Music: Sony/ATV Music (BMI)

Among the many treasures in Fleetwood Mac’s repertoire, the beautiful ballad “Landslide” is one of the most memorable. Penned by Stevie Nicks, the tune was first recorded on the band’s self-titled 1975 album and was released in 1980. However, the song didn’t chart as a single until it was culled from the Mac’s most recent album, “The Dance.” It climbed to No. 10 on Billboard’s Adult Contemporary chart in April 1998 and peaked at No. 51 on The Billboard Hot 100 in August last year:

Most recently the song received a gorgeous, harmony-laden treatment from California-based folk/pop foursome Venice on its new albums, “Spin Art.” The Vanguard Records act consists of brothers Mark and Michael Lennon and their cousins Pat and Kipp Lennon (brother of “The Lawrence Welk Show’s” singing Lennon Sisters). “Landslide” is the only cover tune on the 13-track album.

“Growing up as a family, we always listened to the Beatles, Crosby, Stills & Nash, and the Eagles. Then Fleetwood Mac came along the blew us away,” says Mark Lennon. “When we formed a band 20 years ago, we started doing cover tunes, playing all the clubs in Hollywood. They’d tell me, ‘You’re 14. You come out to sing’ … Then we started writing our own original stuff and doing acoustic shows in 1988 or ’89.

“We started doing a few covers in our acoustic shows and decided to do ‘Landslide.’ We did it in the same key as Stevie Nicks. We just added our own harmonies on the chorus, and people were going crazy.

“We did it for so many years that everybody started saying, ‘You guys should record that. Finally, on this album we were talking about doing a cover time tune. We do the Jackson 5’s ‘I Want You Back’ in our live show for our blended together; but everyone kept saying, ‘You need to do “Landslide.”‘ So finally after all these years, we said, ‘Let’s record it, and if it makes the 12 or 13 of the final cut, it’s there.’

So that’s what we did. It made the cut on the album, and now we’re getting this great feedback from it.”

Lennon says Nicks’ gift as a lyricist makes the song an enduring classic. “Stevie Nicks writes in such an incredible way. Her lyrics are so different. Ten different people could tell you what that song means, and it would all be different meanings … The Lyrics mean something else to everybody. That’s how mystical she is. She can really pull you in. You can make her songs what you want them to be about. Overall, that song is undeniably a beautiful hit.”

Deborah Evans Price / Billboard / September 18, 1999

Categories
Album Reviews Fleetwood Mac (1975)

ALBUM REVIEW: Fleetwood Mac

Not only is Fleetwood Mac no longer blues oriented, it isn’t even really British: The two newest members, Lindsey Buckingham (guitar and vocals) and Stevie Nicks (vocals, acoustic guitar) are American, and all five members are now based in Los Angeles.

The band began its spiritual journey to L.A. a half-dozen albums ago on Future Games when it was led by the often dazzling guitarist/singer Danny Kirwan. Kirwan is long gone but his inspiration lingers in the songs and singing of Christine McVie (who’s also developed into an effective keyboard player) and in the electric guitar playing of Buckingham, who likes to interpose aching, Kirwanesque leads and textured, Byrds-like rhythm lines. Thanks to their efforts, Fleetwood Mac is easily the group’s best and most consistent album since Bare Trees, the last to feature Kirwan.

The four songs written and sung by Christine McVie make it clearer than ever that she’s one of the best female vocalists in pop, and a deft song craftswoman as well. “Say You Love Me,” “Over My Head,” “Sugar Daddy” and “Warm Ways” transform conventional pop-song structures into durably attractive and believably genuine pieces – each sounds like an ideal radio song. McVie’s singing — slightly husky, not beautiful but unaffected — is simply captivating; she does everything right.

But her contributions have been a strong point since she first appeared with the group on Kiln House; what makes this album a marked improvement over the last several are the efforts of Buckingham, who gives Fleetwood Mac a distinguished and fitting guitar and vocal presence, something the band has lacked since Kirwan’s departure. Of the four tracks he dominates, “Monday Morning” has the most initial appeal, but the hard-edged guitar song, “World Turning” (a McVie/Buckingham collaboration) and the gorgeously somber “I’m So Afraid” stand out more and more as the album grows more familiar.

Nicks, on the other hand, has yet to integrate herself into the group style. Compared to McVie’s, her singing seems callow and mannered, especially on “Landslide,” where she sounds lost and out of place — although to be fair, this is more a problem of context than of absolute quality. Her “Rhiannon,” colored by Buckingham’s Kirwan-style guitar, works a little better and “Crystal,” on which Buckingham joins her on lead vocal, suggests that she may yet find a comfortable slot in this band.

Thanks to the rapport that is evident between McVie and Buckingham, Fleetwood Mac adds up to an impressively smooth transitional album.

Bud Scoppa / Rolling Stone / September 25, 1975

Categories
Fleetwood Mac (1975)

Fleetwood Mac

NOT ONLY IS Fleetwood Mac no longer blues oriented, it isn’t even really British: The two newest members, Lindsey Buckingham (guitar and vocals) and Stevie Nicks (vocals, acoustic guitar) are American, and all five members are now based in Los Angeles.

The band began its spiritual journey to L.A. a half-dozen albums ago on Future Games when it was led by the often dazzling guitarist/singer Danny Kirwan. Kirwan is long gone but his inspiration lingers in the songs and singing of Christine McVie (who’s also developed into an effective keyboard player) and in the electric guitar playing of Buckingham, who likes to interpose aching, Kirwanesque leads and textured, Byrds-like rhythm lines. Thanks to their efforts, Fleetwood Mac is easily the group’s best and most consistent album since Bare Trees, the last to feature Kirwan.

The four songs written and sung by Christine McVie make it clearer than ever that she’s one of the best female vocalists in pop, and a deft song craftswoman as well. “Say You Love Me,” “Over My Head,” “Sugar Daddy” and “Warm Ways” transform conventional pop-song structures into durably attractive and believably genuine pieces – each sounds like an ideal radio song. McVie’s singing — slightly husky, not beautiful but unaffected — is simply captivating; she does everything right.

But her contributions have been a strong point since she first appeared with the group on Kiln House; what makes this album a marked improvement over the last several are the efforts of Buckingham, who gives Fleetwood Mac a distinguished and fitting guitar and vocal presence, something the band has lacked since Kirwan’s departure. Of the four tracks he dominates, “Monday Morning” has the most initial appeal, but the hard-edged guitar song, “World Turning” (a McVie/Buckingham collaboration) and the gorgeously somber “I’m So Afraid” stand out more and more as the album grows more familiar.

Nicks, on the other hand, has yet to integrate herself into the group style. Compared to McVie’s, her singing seems callow and mannered, especially on “Landslide,” where she sounds lost and out of place — although to be fair, this is more a problem of context than of absolute quality. Her “Rhiannon,” colored by Buckingham’s Kirwan-style guitar, works a little better and “Crystal,” on which Buckingham joins her on lead vocal, suggests that she may yet find a comfortable slot in this band.

Thanks to the rapport that is evident between McVie and Buckingham, Fleetwood Mac adds up to an impressively smooth transitional album.

© Bud Scoppa / Rolling Stone / September 25, 1975